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Old 6th April 2022, 06:33 AM   #91
jagabuwana
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Yeah that does look quite Bugis-like, with what appears to be a figural hilt.

In the first relief, is much known about the social class / role of the persona holding the keris?
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Old 6th April 2022, 08:44 AM   #92
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In respect of hilts and dress forms, a lot has changed in the last five or six hundred years.


Here is the stele from which the kneeling figure has been taken, it shows a man & woman kneeling in front of a priest, the kneeling figure can probably be interpreted as the priest's servant.

I think it was Callenfels who interpreted this scene as Sedewa expressing his respect to Tambapetra together with Tambapetra's daughter, Pedopo.

This stele is part of a series of reliefs on stele that tells the Sudamala story --- this refers to the Murwokolo ritual to free somebody from evil (mala) and make them pure (suda).
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Old 6th April 2022, 02:09 PM   #93
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The sheath from Candi Sukuh could also be a form similar to the Jamprahan from Bali. Such Ladrangan without Angkup we encounter also on island of Java.

On Panataran carving the overall shape of Gambar can be compared to Bugis Sampir, but Gandar is strongly tapering, very possibly with a curl at the end, in a way comparable to Piha Kaetta sheath.
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Old 6th April 2022, 10:38 PM   #94
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True Gustav, but here we are looking at roots, we are not looking at forms that developed from these roots.
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Old 7th April 2022, 01:32 AM   #95
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To expand a little on my earlier post.

In respect of the Panataran scabbard.

I have visited Panataran --- or Penataran --- three times, in 2018 I was able to spend 10 hours there, however I have not given any time to an in depth study of Panataran.

There have been a number of studies carried out of the Panataran reliefs, perhaps the most notable would be the work done by Satyawati Suleiman. However, in spite of the work that has been done by respected academics it is still difficult to affix concrete interpretations that can be universally agreed upon, to the various reliefs.

The two major stories shown in the reliefs on the main temple are the Ramayana & and the Kresnayana, but working with published data it is not very easy to align interpretations with the actual relief carvings. This could be done, but I think it would take me a considerably longer time than I have so far had available.

As Gustav has pointed out, the gandar of the Panataran scabbard has a form that is unique amongst Javanese scabbard forms, in that it resembles the tip of the Sri Lankan piha kaetta (to use the generally accepted collector term).

I know next to nothing about Sri Lankan/Ceylonese material culture, but I seem to recall that it is very difficult to place the piha kaetta at any earlier time period than the early 1600's, when they seem to have begun to be produced in the workshops of the rulers of Kandy.

The Kingdom of Kandy was, I believe, founded in the late 1400's, Candi Panataran was constructed between circa 1190 & 1455.

It might be tempting to attribute the Panataran scabbard form to an influence from the piha kaetta form, but bearing in mind the relevant dates and the possible relationships between the Kingdom of Kandy and the kingdoms of East Jawa at the relevant times, I do feel that any similarities between the material culture of Kandy and the material culture of East Jawa, might be able to be regarded as purely coincidental.

However, since this scabbard form does seem to exist in two places that would seem rather difficult to associate one with the other, perhaps --- if there is an influence --- any influence in form might be able to be attributed to a form in some other part of South Asia that predates either Kandy or the kingdoms associated with Panataran.

I have examined this scabbard relief carving in situ, and frankly I am not absolutely convinced that the form that we now see is necessarily original, to my eye it appears that the present form could be the result of past damage and then a degree of "tidying up".

In respect of the Sukuh scabbard, I believe that we can definitely attribute later Javanese & Balinese scabbard styles to this style shown in the Sukuh reliefs. In Bali the jamprahan form of scabbard was in times past only used by religious leaders, at the present time it is not a popular form.
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Old 7th April 2022, 10:38 AM   #96
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Up till now I know of three depictions of a tapering Gandar with a scroll at the end - Panataran, Kertolo statue in Museum Pusat and the photograph by Kinsbergen of the Pusakas of Pagar Ruyung. Pagar Ruyung sheath of course could be made at later date, echoing the earlier form.

Worth to notice that the tip on all three specimens scrolls out on the Gandhik side.

Just as a side note regarding Piha Kaetta, which appears always to be linked to the Kingdom of Kandy indeed, there is one interesting curiosity - Golok La Nggunti Rante, a state heirloom of Sultanate of Bima, which is a Piha Kaetta. It is depicted and described in "Court Arts of Indonesia", and with a question mark dated to the 15th cent.
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Last edited by Gustav; 7th April 2022 at 11:17 AM.
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Old 7th April 2022, 11:43 AM   #97
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One more remark regarding Panataran carving.

On Pagar Ruyung Keris Gandhik doesn't protrude beyound the outline of blade, which is typical for "old style" Jalak Budho. Accordingly the sheath has no protruding part at the Gandhik side.

Keris on Panataran carving also has no protruding Gandhik.

The sheath on Panataran carving could be a similar one to Pagar Ruyung sheath, without a protruding part on Gandhik side. Because of the hand covering the "joint" place we visually have the impression of one, but actually the outline may continue at that place.

Of course the Panataran carving is quite rough.

The sheath on Kertolo statue has a different shape at that place, suggesting a blade with protruding Gandhik or perhaps even some sort feature on it.
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Last edited by Gustav; 7th April 2022 at 02:49 PM.
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Old 13th October 2022, 09:37 AM   #98
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Default DOEHOENG PANGÉRAN PAPAK

Hullo everybody!

Just dropping this in. May be of use to someone.

Best,


DOEHOENG Pangéran Papak (aka "Lam Lam Ha" Galeuh Pakoean / Ki Dongkol) :

Current location: reputedly with Ibrahim Adji’s extended family.

1515: gifted to Widjaja Koesoemah II / Ad. Liman Sandjaja (Limbangan) by Rk. Santang / Rj. Sangara.

1575: Upon the death of Widjaja Koesoemah II, it was passed down to his son / successor, Tmg. Wangsa Nagara and subsequently down the family line.

1863: (when these photographs were taken): in the possession of Rd. Wangsa Moehammad (Pg. Papak), of TjiNoenoek Garoet.

1899: in the possesion of inheritor/descendant Wangsa Di Nata.

1936: surrendered by Wangsa Di Nata to Sekar Madji Maridjan Karto Soewirjo of Daroel Islam (DI/TII)

1962: upon his capture, surrendered by Karto Soewirjo to Brig.Gen. Ibrahim Adji , CO of Military Region (KoDaM / DIV.) VI: SilihWangi, who by coincidence, shared the same ancestry as Pg. Papak. Exhibited as part of Operation Restore Peace during The Bandoeng Industrial Exhibition.


LANDÉAN: PwahAtji


WAROEGA:

Form: Betok Kérak


Notes:

- inscription appears to be Al Baqarah 2:255 NOT 2:256.(But then, I haven't used Arabic since infant school.)
- could not see any " Lam Lam Ha" inscribed on blade.

As usual, should there be any deficiencies or incorrect info, please DO let me know.
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Last edited by Amuk Murugul; 14th October 2022 at 07:10 AM. Reason: word correction
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Old 13th October 2022, 05:05 PM   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amuk Murugul View Post
Hullo everybody!

Just dropping this in. May be of use to someone.

Best,


DOEHOENG Pangéran Papak (aka "Lam Lam Ha" Galeuh Pakoean / Ki Dongkol) :

Current location: reputedly with Ibrahim Adji’s extended family.

1515: gifted to Widjaja Koesoemah II / Ad. Liman Sandjaja (Limbangan) by Rk. Santang / Rj. Sangara.

1575: Upon the death of Widjaja Koesoemah II, it was passed down to his son / successor, Tmg. Wangsa Nagara and subsequently down the family line.

1863: (when these photographs were taken): in the possession of Rd. Wangsa Moehammad (Pg. Papak), of TjiNoenoek Garoet.

1899: in the possesion of inheritor/descendant Wangsa Di Nata.

1936: surrendered by Wangsa Di Nata to Sekar Madji Maridjan Karto Soewirjo of Daroel Islam (DI/TII)

1962: upon his arrest, surrendered by Karto Soewirjo to Brig.Gen. Ibrahim Adji , CO of Military Region (KoDaM / DIV.) VI: SilihWangi, who by coincidence, shared the same ancestry as Pg. Papak. Exhibited as part of Operation Restore Peace during The Bandoeng Industrial Exhibition.


LANDÉAN: PwahAtji


WAROEGA:

Form: Betok Kérak


Notes:

- inscription appears to be Al Baqarah 2:255 NOT 2:256.(But then, I haven't used Arabic since infant school.)
- could not see any " Lam Lam Ha" inscribed on blade.

As usual, should there be any deficiencies or incorrect info, please DO let me know.
Thanks Amuk. I am, of course, as many other here probably are, familiar with this keris, though these are some of the best detailed images i have seen to date of them, and your history of the lineage attached to the keris is very interesting.
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Old 13th October 2022, 07:12 PM   #100
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amuk Murugul View Post
Hullo everybody!

Just dropping this in. May be of use to someone.

Best,


DOEHOENG Pangéran Papak (aka "Lam Lam Ha" Galeuh Pakoean / Ki Dongkol) :

Current location: reputedly with Ibrahim Adji’s extended family.

1515: gifted to Widjaja Koesoemah II / Ad. Liman Sandjaja (Limbangan) by Rk. Santang / Rj. Sangara.

1575: Upon the death of Widjaja Koesoemah II, it was passed down to his son / successor, Tmg. Wangsa Nagara and subsequently down the family line.

1863: (when these photographs were taken): in the possession of Rd. Wangsa Moehammad (Pg. Papak), of TjiNoenoek Garoet.

1899: in the possesion of inheritor/descendant Wangsa Di Nata.

1936: surrendered by Wangsa Di Nata to Sekar Madji Maridjan Karto Soewirjo of Daroel Islam (DI/TII)

1962: upon his arrest, surrendered by Karto Soewirjo to Brig.Gen. Ibrahim Adji , CO of Military Region (KoDaM / DIV.) VI: SilihWangi, who by coincidence, shared the same ancestry as Pg. Papak. Exhibited as part of Operation Restore Peace during The Bandoeng Industrial Exhibition.


LANDÉAN: PwahAtji


WAROEGA:

Form: Betok Kérak


Notes:

- inscription appears to be Al Baqarah 2:255 NOT 2:256.(But then, I haven't used Arabic since infant school.)
- could not see any " Lam Lam Ha" inscribed on blade.

As usual, should there be any deficiencies or incorrect info, please DO let me know.
Thank you very much
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Old 14th October 2022, 08:27 AM   #101
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amuk Murugul View Post
Hullo everybody!


Notes:

- inscription appears to be Al Baqarah 2:255 NOT 2:256.(But then, I haven't used Arabic since infant school.)
- could not see any " Lam Lam Ha" inscribed on blade.

As usual, should there be any deficiencies or incorrect info, please DO let me know.

Thanks for the info, kang Amuk.

My Arabic is also rusty, but I'd like to offer an alternative. In the first horizontal photo, reading from top right I do not recognise this to be in Q2:255 , which in Islam is the Ayat al Kursi - an important prayer for many occasions but most commonly for protection against evil and, in Indonesia, for Islamic exorcism.

Instead, what I can make out is:
  • Allahu akbar - meaning "God is great". This could be followed by
  • La hawla wa la quwwata illa billah - meaning "There is no power or strength except (through/by) God".

Both of these phrases are adhkar (plural of dhikr) - words or utterances intended to be repeated as a way of remembering God. Kind of like a mantra. This 2nd one is informally called the hawqala.

The hawqala portion is not that clear to read so I welcome any correction. But it would make sense that this is included. The hawqala is a refrain used quite often as a way of reconciling that which could be taboo or forbidden, with mainline Islamic beliefs. There are plenty of Muslim Indonesians who believe in the idea that a keris can bring luck or blessings, or make them do extraordinary things. In most interpretations of orthodox Islam this is idolatry - everybody knows this. So the hawqala is used to reconcile the fact that the keris has powers, but all power is eventually from God (as opposed to its tuah as conferred to it by an mpu, for example).

The hawqala is not from the Qur'an - it is from recorded Prophetic narrations, which are an inseparable part of Muslim theology and practice.

The rest of the inscriptions are too unclear for me to make out. I might return to it to have a crack at another time. But I would not be surprised if it was more adhkar.

As for Lam Lam Ha - these are the last three Arabic letters that make up Allah, the first one being Alif. It is common in Muslim esotericism to find that individual letters (huruf) are used in this manner. I believe this stems from the Muqatta'at - the "disjointed letters" of the Quran that open some of its chapters. The only consensus about these letters in mainstream Sunni Islam is that they're deliberately mysterious and that only God knows what they truly mean. Obviously that's too enticing an invitation for a mystic. So esoteric Islam thereafter found ways of interpreting and using these letters to approach the sacred through hidden symbolism.

Last edited by jagabuwana; 14th October 2022 at 08:28 AM. Reason: Quotation added for clarity. Sentence structures modified for clarity.
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Old 14th October 2022, 10:32 AM   #102
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Amuk, thank you.
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Old 19th November 2022, 07:25 AM   #103
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Default Soenda Regents in Formal Attire

Hullo everybody!

Just dropping in these photos. They may be informative for someone.

Best,
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Old 19th November 2022, 08:26 PM   #104
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Default CORRECTION!

Hullo everybody!

Just correcting a mistake made in haste.
The second photo in my previous post is not correct. Attached is the correct one.
Best,
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Last edited by Amuk Murugul; 19th November 2022 at 08:53 PM. Reason: clarification
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Old 2nd January 2023, 01:52 AM   #105
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Default NOT a Regent at the time of photo

Hullo everybody!

Just another photo, more often than not, misrepresented (even by those who should've known better).

Best,
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