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Old 15th February 2020, 03:59 PM   #1
corrado26
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Default A very strange British gun

I have no opinion what this gun might have really been made for. Perhaps there is anybody who has an idea or knows what it is. The butt and the lock are from an early Brown Bess ca. 1720, the lock is marked 1741, but what is the barrel made for? Perhaps a gun to shoot the rope of a boarding hook to an other ship?
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Old 15th February 2020, 05:22 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corrado26
--- Perhaps a gun to shoot the rope of a boarding hook to an other ship?...

Could be, Udo. The modification doesn't have to be British, though.
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Old 15th February 2020, 05:43 PM   #3
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Or something like this?
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Old 15th February 2020, 06:02 PM   #4
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And what is that one for, Marcus ?
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Old 15th February 2020, 06:45 PM   #5
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Shooting grenades
Its on display on veste Coburg.. alongside the two alcove/snall stocked hand cannons of Michael.
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Old 15th February 2020, 07:33 PM   #6
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A grenade thrower; my first thought of Udo's example... honestly.
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Old 16th February 2020, 08:11 AM   #7
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Well if you ever find yourself in Coburg Germany (or plan a whole vacation around ir like i did O_O)
Than you should visit the Veste Coburg for sure, the sheer amount of cannons, haquebuts, matchlock, armour, pikes, lances, shield, combustables..... well you know, just a place were anyone of us would like to take his/her residence

Attached are some more pictures i found of flintlock Tower (addapted?) grenade throwers.
https://www.bidsquare.com/online-au...770-1790-324263
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Old 16th February 2020, 08:35 AM   #8
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Many thanks for this help. It is interesting to learn that such type of guns have been obviuosly and actually in use during the 18. century. But the ammunition or the grenade used is still a mystery for me
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Old 16th February 2020, 09:44 AM   #9
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Hi,

this type of pyrotechnic flintlock gun ,with the moulded rings soldered on the barrel were found in the netherlands in the middle of the 18th century, see example from the Visser collection.

fe Puype, the Visser collection Volume1, part 1 p 442
cat 156.


Pistols and guns with barrels of this particular type, i.e. with the multiple ring mouldings, appear in literature mostly as "signaling", "flare" of "pyrotechnic" guns
because of the thickness of the walls allow other ammunition, it is now believed that such barrels were generally strong enough to have fired besides pyrotechnics( relatively light incendiary projects) heavier loads
such as grape, canister and buckshot.
it is also likely that those guns have fired lighter kinds of caliber-sized bullets, fe cast iron but also lighter materials, such as glas , clay etc. (cf JP Puype )



best ,
Jasper
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Old 16th February 2020, 10:17 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corrado26
Many thanks for this help. It is interesting to learn that such type of guns have been obviuosly and actually in use during the 18. century. But the ammunition or the grenade used is still a mystery for me
corrado26



Yes, I wondered about that as well.
Hand thrown grenades just had a fuse to light. But I did find this in Gilkerson - the missile extends beyond barrel to be ignited or have a fuse lit. I guess there were many variations - some also have chains and hooks to catch in the sails and set them alight.

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Old 16th February 2020, 02:50 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CutlassCollector
Yes, I wondered about that as well.
Hand thrown grenades just had a fuse to light. But I did find this in Gilkerson - the missile extends beyond barrel to be ignited or have a fuse lit. I guess there were many variations - some also have chains and hooks to catch in the sails and set them alight.

CC

But this doesn't tell us how the grenade was thrown away from the barrel ... or does it ?
Certainly not like nowadays, in that they use a bulletless cartridge containing propellant gas !
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Old 16th February 2020, 04:13 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fernando
But this doesn't tell us how the grenade was thrown away from the barrel ... or does it ?
Certainly not like nowadays, in that they use a bulletless cartridge containing propellant gas !



I guess the gun was charged with powder into the first section smaller diameter of the barrel and then the stem of the grenade/missile is designed to match the larger diameter of the barrel and is pushed right down on top of the charge.
Marcus's post 3 gives a good impression.

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Old 16th February 2020, 04:17 PM   #13
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I think that they used an appropriate charge of powder that was big enough to expel the stick with the grenade. But honestly said I would'nt hold that gun in my hands and press it against my shoulder firing it.
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Old 16th February 2020, 04:31 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corrado26
I think that they used an appropriate charge of powder that was big enough to expel the stick with the grenade. But honestly said I would'nt hold that gun in my hands and press it against my shoulder firing it.


Agreed!!
But not as bad as the Nock Volley gun that fired all seven barrels at the same time.
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Old 16th February 2020, 05:00 PM   #15
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Old 16th February 2020, 05:10 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CutlassCollector
I guess the gun was charged with powder into the first section smaller diameter of the barrel and then the stem of the grenade/missile is designed to match the larger diameter of the barrel and is pushed right down on top of the charge.
Marcus's post 3 gives a good impression.

CC

Marcus example ... yes. I was thinking of other systems, like in the other examples posted; barrels of regular section, no sticks attached to the grenade.
My imagination ? .
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