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Old 10th July 2019, 01:04 AM   #1
Camoga
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Default Spanish Percussion Pistol

Hello Friends,

Recently my father gave me a Spanish percussion pistol as a gift.
It was donated to him so there is no background info. There is an engraving on the barrel that says "FABRICADO POR PEDRO M AGUIRRE EN EIBAR 1860,"
(Made by Pedro M Aguirre in Eibar 1860). I have little knowledge about these pistols so any help in identify will be greatly appreciated. Doing an internet search I was able to find Eibar was a famous city in Spain know for its armories and that there is a gunsmith by the name of Pedro J Aguirre who started in 1864. I am wondering if Pedro M was the father.

The gun is in terrible shape so any tips on restoring would be great.

Once again thank you for your time,
Samuel
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Old 10th July 2019, 11:08 AM   #2
fernando
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Hello Samuel,
I am redirecting your thread to the European section, where your topic will hopefully receive expected answers.
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Old 10th July 2019, 01:26 PM   #3
corrado26
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Pedro AGUIRRE is listed in the "Neue Stöckel" twice, one at Eibar in 1763 and the other at Eibar in 1840 to 1850. The second is also listed by W. Keith Neal, Spanish Guns and Pistols at Eibar in 1841.
So this second Pedro Aguirre must be the maker of your pistol. Unfortunately it is in a very bad state so you will have much to do in order to getting this piece in a collectable condition.
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Old 10th July 2019, 03:12 PM   #4
Fernando K
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Hello

The correct signature is PEDRO Ma. (Maria) DE AGUIRRE
Eibar1840-1850
Ramiro Larrañaga "Historical Synthesis of the Basque Armeria", page 195

Interesting is the method of embedding metals in the legend. I guess it will be silver, for the brightness. I do not know the technique, I guess it will not be the oriental, and it does not seem to be traditional damascene

Affectionately
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Old 10th July 2019, 03:44 PM   #5
fernando
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fernando K
...The correct signature is PEDRO Ma. (Maria) DE AGUIRRE
Eibar1840-1850. Ramiro Larrañaga "Historical Synthesis of the Basque Armeria", page 195...

Muy bien Fernando, tocayo amigo .
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Old 11th July 2019, 02:03 AM   #6
Camoga
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fernando K
Hello

The correct signature is PEDRO Ma. (Maria) DE AGUIRRE
Eibar1840-1850
Ramiro Larrañaga "Historical Synthesis of the Basque Armeria", page 195

Interesting is the method of embedding metals in the legend. I guess it will be silver, for the brightness. I do not know the technique, I guess it will not be the oriental, and it does not seem to be traditional damascene

Affectionately



Your right, there is an A very lightly engraved above and to the right of the M.
The piece is in very bad shape but I would still like to have it on display at my house so I thank all of you guys for your help.
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Old 11th July 2019, 06:59 AM   #7
Victrix
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You can put a little bit of walnut oil on the wood and mineral oil on the metal parts.
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Old 11th July 2019, 02:10 PM   #8
Fernando K
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Hello

Whatever your state, any piece can be valued, and collectible. Some claim an impeccable piece, others are satisfied with what is achieved. The wood can be glued and taken to its original shape and the iron can deoxidize, the drumstick can be replaced, although it will not be original ......

Affectionately
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Old 11th July 2019, 07:09 PM   #9
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Thanks Fernando K and Victrix.
What would be your thoughts and using a polish like Brasso on the metal?
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Old 11th July 2019, 08:04 PM   #10
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These kinds of pieces to be are incredibly and ruggedly charming, and for me the closest they than be kept to their 'in situ' condition, the better they reflect the history they have seen. I always believe in minimal control of any existing corrosion, with as much patination left as possible. With acid etching, it is often a fragile advance indeed.

That sunburst or starburst or whatever on the trigger guard is very similar to same seen on considerable material culture and weaponry in Mexico, and reflects the Peninsular heritage of these people. Some of my favorite arms are those of 19th c. Mexico and earlier in the colonial Spanish periods. While this is of course a Spanish made weapon, it certainly reflects the many examples which came to Mexico with industrious Spanish families seeking prosperity in Mexico.
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Old 12th July 2019, 11:34 AM   #11
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Hello, camoga

The only way to deoxidize the metal, is the electrolytic method, which desconpone the oxide in the most remote places, such as wells or "caries", where you can not reach with any abrasive. Of course the surface will not be polished, grayish, but the most important thing is that the corrosion is stopped, because there is no foreign body (oxide) on the surface. You will have to be careful with the inscription in the cannon, and make a test in another material, in order not to cause any damage.

Sorry for the translator.

Affectionately
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Old 12th July 2019, 06:18 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Camoga
Thanks Fernando K and Victrix.
What would be your thoughts and using a polish like Brasso on the metal?


Camoga,

I’m not a professional restorer, just a history enthusiast and amateur collector. I agree with Jim’s statement that part of antique objects’ charm often lies in their ruggedness. I would personally not polish a gun barrel. In your case I would clean the metals parts carefully with some white spirit. Then apply some mineral oil and let dry in a dust free environment. Then when dry I would apply some renaissance wax on the metal parts. I would apply a thin layer of walnut oil on the wood. The alternative would be to have the gun restored professionally which would likely not be worth the cost.
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Old 20th July 2019, 06:05 AM   #13
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Default conservation of wood

Samuel,
The previous posts contain some very good do-it-yourself tips for treating the metal. Being an antique arms restorer by trade and looking at your gun in its current state I wholeheartedly agree with Jim, et al, that polishing or indeed any over-aggressive cleaning of the metal is not desirable. The patina that you see on much of the steel is actually quite pleasing, much more so than a "scoured" surface.

If the screws turn freely and you have properly fitting screwdrivers, you might want to dismount the barrel and lock to likewise clean and conserve the interior metal surfaces as well. A lot of times, active rust is present in those areas covered by wood since they are not easily accessible during whatever cursory cleaning and oiling the piece may have had over generations. Stubborn rust can in most cases be scraped off with tools fashioned from little strips of brass or soft metal (not knives or screwdriver blades!), and hardened grease and dirt removed via the methods described previously.

The destructive effect of rust often transfers from metal to wood, where the oxidation (which is enabled by moisture) can lead to staining and even decay. Cleaning the accumulated dirt, grease, and other crud off the wood can safely be done with acetone applied with cotton swabs, small stiff bristle brushes, and bits of old toweling (depending on the amount of accumulation and the surface area involved). The scrapers you made for metal de-rusting can be used to gently tease adhering rust clumps free of the wood. The good thing about using something like acetone is that it evaporates quickly and leaves no oily residue, so if you want to glue back any loose slivers of wood, or fix the big crack on the underside, your wood adhesive will hold firmly. After that you can use the oils mentioned in the prior posts and finish with Renaissance wax.

Be patient, going as far as skill allows, and you can end up with quite a good result. Do keep us apprised of your progress and please post some pics of the finished job.
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