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Old 17th July 2019, 07:21 AM   #1
ALEX
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Default Is this a Navaja knife?

A small folding clasp knife dated 1939. The blade stamped with several marks and has unusual brass/silver? inlay. Does it look like Navaja knife? Thanks!
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Old 17th July 2019, 08:38 PM   #2
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Yes
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Old 18th July 2019, 01:43 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by mross
Yes


Why?

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Old 18th July 2019, 04:08 PM   #4
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Alex, this is a very interesting knife, whether comparable or not to a Navaja which, as the name says, belongs in a different universe.
Let's move your thread to the Ethno forum where, judging by the culture from which your piece appears to be, our members in there may have a word to say about it.
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Old 18th July 2019, 08:24 PM   #5
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Is it locked when opened? Nice anyway!

Detlef
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Old 19th July 2019, 05:26 AM   #6
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It appears to be a slip-joint, held open only by the thumb on the extended ringed tang extension rather than the locking pull ring or lifting lever of the racheting navajas. Might be spanish, looks like it, strong Islamic influences there at one time.

Navaja appears to be fairly generic for 'razor' or 'folding knife' and a few others.
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Old 19th July 2019, 07:59 AM   #7
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Fernando,
Thanks for moving it to more appropriate forum.

Detlef,
There is no lock mechanism. As Kronckew pointed, the blade simply opens and closes by force.

Also, here is another knife, also without locking mechanism but fine racheting action on open/close. I cannot read the small sign on the small shield emblem (copsa, corse??). Have anyone seen similar? Is it also Spanish? Modern?
Thanks
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Old 19th July 2019, 08:31 AM   #8
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Corse = Corsica

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Old 19th July 2019, 08:37 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ALEX
...Also, here is another knife, also without locking mechanism but fine racheting action on open/close. I cannot read the small sign on the small shield emblem (copsa, corse??). Have anyone seen similar? Is it also Spanish? Modern?...

Again a non genuine navaja but a folding knife from CORSICA, a Mediterranian island with a long tradition. The figure is that a Moor's head, their flag symbol, the Moor having his eyes covered with a headband before 1755 and after with his eyes uncovered representing their liberation.
I would say this is a modern piece; Vendetta meaning revenge, their traditional mythical culture.

.
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Old 19th July 2019, 06:20 PM   #10
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Yup, and it's a ring-pull lock knife, with the ring missing. It's NOT in the style of Corsican folding vendetta knives either. Looks French.
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Old 20th July 2019, 07:27 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kronckew
Yup, and it's a ring-pull lock knife, with the ring missing. It's NOT in the style of Corsican folding vendetta knives either. Looks French.


I think that your are right on the money, most probably made in France!

This is what Bernard Levine had to say:

"....It is called a Vendetta Corse or Corsican 'vendetta' knife. They are mainly sold in the island of Corsica, in the Mediterranean Sea. Some are made in Bastia, Corsica. Others are made in Thiers, on the French mainland. They are made in step sizes. For more details, see pages 303 and 304 of Levine's Guide to Knives, 4th Editio...."

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Old 20th July 2019, 07:31 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ALEX
A small folding clasp knife dated 1939. The blade stamped with several marks and has unusual brass/silver? inlay. Does it look like Navaja knife? Thanks!


"Navaja" in Spanish is synonymous with folding knife, so yes, your knife is literally a navaja.

However, if what you are really asking is whether the knife is Spanish or not, that is another matter entirely, and judging by its general appearance I am inclined to say no. Looks like a rustic peasant's knife made somewhere else.

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Old 20th July 2019, 09:08 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fernando
I would say this is a modern piece; Vendetta meaning revenge, their traditional mythical culture.
.


Well well well I won't say mythical. These people like to fight. They will kill you if you just look at their sisters. I prefer to not speak of theirs mothers... Corsica produced Napoleon that is a good example of man of war. The original vendetta knife is similar to the Genoese knive that is just logic as Corsica shares more with Italia than France.

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Old 20th July 2019, 09:31 AM   #14
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Kubar's sketch shows the traditional fixed blade version - I would like to eventually own one, but they are rare and expensive as antiques. Still made today tho.

Meanwhile, the 'real' folding versions are fairly well available, and all have basically the same general shape, a narrowish single edged spearpoint blade designed for thrusting, and the reduction in grip area just behind the bolster. they come in diffeent sizes, grip scale materials, and can be locking or not.

The french Laguiole style style usually has a long clipped spine single edge, also can be locking or non-locking, note NO notch.

Found a Mythical () Corsican knife maker that combines the best of both the fixed style and is folding (back-lock), not an antique tho. They also make the fixed blade stylus versions, just a whole lot more expensive. Mine: approx. 20.5 cm. open, 100 gm, 440C, hand made, each is unique.
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Old 20th July 2019, 10:03 AM   #15
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...and they make this one in wood grip - it looks very familiar, I think I've seen it's like before here. A myth is as good as a smile.
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Old 20th July 2019, 11:53 AM   #16
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Alex, the first example you showed is a rather interesting piece. Whether it could (should) be considered a navaja, i would humbly say no. Navaja ( Novăcula) is the name of a folding knife in a Spanish context, which i don't think is the case here.
It looks like it has (smith) marks in both blade faces, which is an undeniable added value; adding to that i would not reject the possibility that the three digit date in the handle is not for 1939 but for 1839.
In any case having nothing to do, in collecting terms, with your recent Corsican 'Vendetta' nor with the modern 'cutlery' that is being shown in its regard ... if i dare say
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Old 20th July 2019, 12:02 PM   #17
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...only shown for reference to their traditional shapes which are timeless.
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Old 20th July 2019, 12:06 PM   #18
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Yes, it is a Navaja, most likely made in France ( Thiers was the gorilla of stamping them in huge quantities). This is described in a book by Denis Cherevichnik about the history of knife fights around the world. A splendid book published regretfully only in Russian. It reads like a “ Captain Blood Odyssey” but with impeccable historical analysis and background and a ton of references. If you are interested, I can send you a link to the publisher.

Have you found it in Uzbekistan, of all places?????

Well, if so, one could fantasize that it was brought there by one of the Soviet
“ volunteers” fighting in Spain on the Republican side. The very first pic shows a hammer and a sickle. Spain was a testing ground for both German and Soviet forces in preparation for WW2. Kind of like Syria these day.
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Old 20th July 2019, 01:55 PM   #19
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Default Just kidding ...

S we would have a French couteau à ressort, exported to Spain tagged as navaja, in such a peculiar disguise, bought by a товарищ who then engraved it with an hammer & sickle, before being reallocated to Uzbekistan ...
Don't tell me Ariel; i know i am a schmuck .
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Old 20th July 2019, 08:55 PM   #20
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Thanks to all for information and an interesting discussion.

Ariel, I did not even notice the 'hammer and sickle' symbol. The knife was found in Uzbekistan indeed, so the historical references you provided could well be a case.

Fernando, I also thought of the blade as being older, based on the marks is does look 18thC, however, even though the horn slabs show some age and insect damage, they do not look as old as the blade to me.
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Old 21st July 2019, 08:30 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ALEX
...Ariel, I did not even notice the 'hammer and sickle' symbol. The knife was found in Uzbekistan indeed, so the historical references you provided could well be a case...

Here i bow down to Ariel's knowledge .



.

Last edited by fernando : 21st July 2019 at 08:48 PM.
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