Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > European Armoury
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 6th June 2019, 02:59 PM   #1
BUCC_Guy
Member
 
BUCC_Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Tennessee, USA
Posts: 15
Default My polearm collection for your amusement

Someone from another forum advised I stop by here for antique weapon info.

Iíve been collecting polearms for almost a decade. Iíve purchased from retail, like Fagan Arms (ouch! My wallet!), auctions in the U.S., and most recently from Czernyís in Italy. Communication has been spotty with Czernyís and only half my auction winnings actually arrived, so... yeah.

Iím still learning the photo upload system, but I have attached photos as such in addition to linking to my hosting site:

My entryway with polearms displayed currently
Older photos showing closeups of some heads
Excess/extras in my umbrella stand, stacked in a corner
Closeups of newer ones that just arrived from Italy


I usually post on gun forums and I use firearms for scale, because everyone over there understands the scale. The pistol in these photos is a CZ75 for reference.

So far, the bulk of the collection is as such:

Lucerne Hammer, circa 1560, original wood
Partisan, likely 17th century
Halberd, munitions grade, blackened, low quality, late 16th c.
Voulge (I donít call it a bardiche, but I know why some would) 15th c.(?)
Glaive - very likely 19th/20th c. repro (leaned against wall)
Voulge - German, mid 15th c. - I suspect a Victorian repro (leaned against wall)
Boar spear (umbrella stand) - no supporting info
Halberd - still researching, animal figures/shapes (umbrella stand)
Fauchard (Glaive) - pictured with CZ75 - Northern Italy circa 1550
Lance - pictured with CZ75 - Italian, mid to late 15th century



I travel on business for weeks at a time and canít get better photos for now. I am a remote worker and limited to an iPad, so resizing and posting photos is an absolute chore.



I have two more polearms coming in from Italy soon... I hope. Iím dealing with Italians so anything can happen.

On my wish list is a spetum, batwing corseque, and I need to step up my halberd game. I have devised a new polearm display system to be installed after my $3300 lighting install, and I should be able to display 12-14 vertically, as opposed to half that as they are splayed out now.

Do let me know if you have any questions.

Iíve given up on embedding more photos in the post. Itís incredibly frustrating.

The last two, just purchased, as such:
Attached Images
        

Last edited by fernando : 7th June 2019 at 05:51 PM.
BUCC_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th June 2019, 08:23 AM   #2
Victrix
Member
 
Victrix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Sweden
Posts: 300
Default

Nice collection! Thatís quite an armoury you have there. I stopped buying from Italy. You must have the patience of a saint.

The thing on the left in the third photo is a Swedish pike with guard m/1697 (they remained in issue until 19thC).
Victrix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th June 2019, 12:18 PM   #3
BUCC_Guy
Member
 
BUCC_Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Tennessee, USA
Posts: 15
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Victrix
Nice collection! Thatís quite an armoury you have there. I stopped buying from Italy. You must have the patience of a saint.

The thing on the left in the third photo is a Swedish pike with guard m/1697 (they remained in issue until 19thC).


Good eye! Yes, it is an m/1697. It was the second polearm I ever bought.

I know very little about them except that there are a lot of them on the market compared to other items.
Attached Images
 
BUCC_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th June 2019, 01:33 PM   #4
CSinTX
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 145
Default

Welcome fellow AR15'er. Nice collection.
CSinTX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th June 2019, 05:47 PM   #5
fernando
Lead Moderator European Armoury
 
fernando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal
Posts: 7,408
Default

Welcome to the forum Guy .Beautiful pieces you show us .
As per rules, we only consider pictures uploaded with our attachment features. To make it easy for you, the first ones you linked from photo hosts were deleted (by me) and reloaded accordingly, now appearing in the end of the thread.

PS
... And then i noticed that you posted the said images with both systems .
Post re-edited; all is well .

Last edited by fernando : 7th June 2019 at 06:00 PM.
fernando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 8th June 2019, 12:51 AM   #6
batjka
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 33
Default

Glad you joined! This place is a treasure of knowledge. Perhaps someone could chime in about the berdiche-looking weapon.

And that hammer is very interesting.
batjka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th July 2019, 06:08 AM   #7
BUCC_Guy
Member
 
BUCC_Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Tennessee, USA
Posts: 15
Default

A new shipment of polearms arrived, two from Italy and two halberds from Auctions Imperial. One halberd I quite like, the other one was a waste of money. I think itís real, it just has minimal... flavor.


Iíll shamelessly use auction photos for some.

Thereís a bardiche looking weapon that I really hesitate to call a bardiche. Iím going to continue to do research on it, as it certainly has the shape associated with early extant halberds and artistic renditions from the 13th-14th century. As we know from art examples, there was a range of one to three sockets, some some voulge-like examples with capped/long sockets, so attachment method, to me, takes a back seat to blade shape. But, as we know, there were some peasant weapons all the way through the 18th century that used this shape also. Most later examples, however, had a larger gap between blade and shaft.

Iíve enclosed a painting from the mid 13th century and an example of a 13th century halberd for comparison.

Additionally, I received what appears to be a mid-16th century corseque, although I typically call this a ranseur. Langets shorted, but otherwise a nice example.

Also attached is a rather petite but stout Swiss halberd, Iíd reckon mid to late 16th century. I rather like it, owing to the short and sturdy spike.

Also in view is a rather boring Swiss halberd, shortened haft.

Iím running out of space! Hopefully I will have a new gallery hanging system this summer.
Attached Images
       
BUCC_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th July 2019, 01:08 PM   #8
fernando
Lead Moderator European Armoury
 
fernando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal
Posts: 7,408
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BUCC_Guy
... Iíve enclosed a painting from the mid 13th century and an example of a 13th century halberd for comparison...

Both exceptional, no doubt .

Quote:
Originally Posted by BUCC_Guy
...Iím running out of space ...

I could help you with that .
fernando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th July 2019, 02:00 PM   #9
BUCC_Guy
Member
 
BUCC_Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Tennessee, USA
Posts: 15
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by fernando
Both exceptional, no doubt .


I could help you with that .



Iíve engineered a new hanging system, and purchased $2000 in art gallery lighting. I should be able to fit 14 polearms on the walls that currently have only 6... and theyíll be properly lit!

The only one Iíve ever considered selling is an American Revolution era pike. Americans donít do polearms well... weíre better at other weapons... that I also have too many of.

Attached Images
 

Last edited by BUCC_Guy : 4th July 2019 at 09:58 PM.
BUCC_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th July 2019, 02:01 PM   #10
Victrix
Member
 
Victrix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Sweden
Posts: 300
Default

Congrats on the expanded collection! I particularly like the sturdy Swiss halberd. I have a similar one but with a longer spike and a hook. Donít despair of the item with the shortened haft as these can be used in displays where the piece of missing haft is concealed by a shield, piece of furniture, etc.

You may consider procuring a rack for your pole arms, the type which they used in castle armouries. These are cool and prevent you from running out of space.
Victrix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th July 2019, 02:16 PM   #11
BUCC_Guy
Member
 
BUCC_Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Tennessee, USA
Posts: 15
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Victrix
Congrats on the expanded collection! I particularly like the sturdy Swiss halberd. I have a similar one but with a longer spike and a hook. Donít despair of the item with the shortened haft as these can be used in displays where the piece of missing haft is concealed by a shield, piece of furniture, etc.

You may consider procuring a rack for your pole arms, the type which they used in castle armouries. These are cool and prevent you from running out of space.


I will likely have a custom rack made when I buy a house. For now, I live in a 30+ story highrise, and my rack will be more modern looking.

This is the shortened halberd. Youíre right... I can do lots of things to hide the bottom! Itís just annoying that itís more effort, but at least it didnít cost much.
Attached Images
 
BUCC_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th July 2019, 02:22 PM   #12
fernando
Lead Moderator European Armoury
 
fernando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal
Posts: 7,408
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BUCC_Guy
... weíre better at other weapons... that I also have too many of. ...

You need not bother showing those ... at all; this is not the right venue for such sort of things !.
fernando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th July 2019, 03:15 PM   #13
Terry K
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 85
Default

Very nice collection!
Terry K is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th July 2019, 10:05 PM   #14
Victrix
Member
 
Victrix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Sweden
Posts: 300
Default

For when you move into that house.
Attached Images
   
Victrix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th July 2019, 12:13 AM   #15
CSinTX
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 145
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BUCC_Guy
Also attached is a rather petite but stout Swiss halberd, Iíd reckon mid to late 16th century. I rather like it, owing to the short and sturdy spike.


I think this piece may be styrian. Take a look at the one here. The design and "keyholes" are very similar to yours. It has the "HW" mark that is known to be styrian.

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...ghlight=halberd
CSinTX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th July 2019, 02:48 AM   #16
BUCC_Guy
Member
 
BUCC_Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Tennessee, USA
Posts: 15
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CSinTX
I think this piece may be styrian. Take a look at the one here. The design and "keyholes" are very similar to yours. It has the "HW" mark that is known to be styrian.

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...ghlight=halberd


Very well could be!

I should have posted mine with the makers mark showing.
Attached Images
 
BUCC_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th July 2019, 03:21 AM   #17
CSinTX
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 145
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BUCC_Guy
I should have posted mine with the makers mark showing.


With that mark, you might want to check out this thread, if you havent already. Several Swiss halberds with similar marks. Who knows?

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...87&page=1&pp=30
CSinTX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th July 2019, 08:00 AM   #18
Victrix
Member
 
Victrix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Sweden
Posts: 300
Default

Makersí marks make collecting much more interesting, but has frustrations on itís own. I recognize the mark but canít recall the name now... The marks on polearms seem less known than swords. This style of halberd is German, which could be just about anywhere in the Germanic lands including Styria (Steiermark). It looks sturdy and the short but thick spike makes it look functional rather than a parade item. I did some research on my halberd. Apart from the shape of the blade you can compare the construction of the socket with museum pieces.

These halberds are Styrian from the Army (Heeresgeschichtliche) Museum in Vienna. I think most identifiable Austrian halberds were made in either Wiener Neustadt or Steyr.
Attached Images
 

Last edited by Victrix : 5th July 2019 at 08:17 AM.
Victrix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th July 2019, 09:03 AM   #19
kronckew
Member
 
kronckew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: CSA Consulate, Rm. 101, Glos. UK: p.s. - Real Dogs Have Feathering.
Posts: 3,006
Talking

Cool collection. Here in the UK Infantry Colour Sergeants carried Halberds like mine below into the late 18c. (2nd/3rd photo).

.
Attached Images
  

Last edited by fernando : 6th July 2019 at 04:35 PM. Reason: inconvenient ...ness
kronckew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th July 2019, 08:59 PM   #20
CSinTX
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 145
Default

Nice collection! Artillery shells can work for display but careful, they get tippy. Wouldn't want them to fall and poleaxe the cat.
Attached Images
 
CSinTX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th July 2019, 09:34 PM   #21
fernando
Lead Moderator European Armoury
 
fernando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal
Posts: 7,408
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CSinTX
... Artillery shells can work for display but careful, they get tippy. Wouldn't want them to fall and poleaxe the cat.

Says i, with three of them around the house. For safety, besides placing the shells against corners, i glue a larger square of acrylic under their base.

.
Attached Images
 
fernando is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 07:32 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.