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Old 12th October 2020, 01:09 PM   #31
Raf
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Nice graphic. Perhaps you need to add a blind ( decorative } rivit head at the point of your red arrow to make it clear that the rivit head you see on the outside of the tail isn't the same as the one securing the leather . Except at the top and bottom of the articulated section. Although the center strap isn't strictly speaking necessary the assumption is that the springiness of the leather helped the lames to fold in an orderly fashion and not get stuck or rattle around.
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Old 12th October 2020, 06:04 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fernando
Besides the possible function the leather straps perform in controlling the articulation, one must consider that, one lame itself can not roll up more than to a limited point, as it meets the upper lame.
Does this make any sense ?
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raf
Nice graphic. Perhaps you need to add a blind ( decorative } rivit head at the point of your red arrow to make it clear that the rivit head you see on the outside of the tail isn't the same as the one securing the leather . Except at the top and bottom of the articulated section. Although the center strap isn't strictly speaking necessary the assumption is that the springiness of the leather helped the lames to fold in an orderly fashion and not get stuck or rattle around.


This is great. I feel I learned so much about a hitherto neglected part of an object from my perspective. Now I know more what to look for when I next handle armour, especially Zischägge.
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Last edited by Victrix : 12th October 2020 at 07:13 PM.
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Old 12th October 2020, 07:10 PM   #33
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For some relaxation, let me show how an artist views a functional nasal bar.

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Old 12th October 2020, 07:16 PM   #34
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And in case you don't fancy such solution, you can always opt for the hinged three bar version, like this 1640 harquebusier real thing.
(British National Army Museum)

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Old 17th October 2020, 09:57 AM   #35
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When looking through ”Armourers’ Marks” (1959) by Dudley S Hawtrey Gyngell I noticed how armourers in Innsbruck, Austria in 16thC used their initials (one or two letters) as maker’s marks.

My helmet is marked with a Gothic ”S” on the bottom lame on the neck guard which is probably the maker’s mark from Innsbruck, Austria or elsewhere in the Tyrol.
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