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Old 20th September 2020, 06:00 PM   #1
CharlesS
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Default Is this a Javanese Keris Blade???

I mentioned several weeks ago that I had attended a swap meet and picked up some interesting keris/es. This is one of them. While nicely dressed in a traditional Javanese style, I'm having a hard time coming to terms with the blade being Javanese as it is so different from any Javanese blade I have ever handled. It is very thick and heavy...likely the heaviest keris I have ever handled. The pamor looks to be an "adeg" pattern, but it is in a very pale gray and there is no sign it was ever any darker. Everything fits together nicely, but this blade has me vexed.

I am grateful for any feedback.
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Old 20th September 2020, 07:47 PM   #2
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Hum, not a masterpiece of forging and carving IMO (greneng, kembang kacang, sogokan, etc.). It does not look typically javanese to me and to have been made recently by an unexperienced smith, but other opinions are welcome.
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Old 20th September 2020, 09:00 PM   #3
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I agree with Jean on a number of fronts, though I'm not sure if i would call it "nicely dressed". If the hilt is actually ivory and the metal piece silver, then there is some value in the dress, but the hilt is not finely carved, the selut is badly fitted and the wrongko is nothing special and in bad condition. The blade itself is, as Jean has pointed out, no great masterpiece. It does seem to be somewhat recent. The features are all rather poorly carved and because the lines of the pamor do not seem to follow the curves of the blade is suspect the the luks were put in place through stock removal rather than being forged that way. So it does not seem to be a blade that has been approached by any decently skilled Javanese smith. I do suppose it is possible that this is some inexperienced Javanese smith's attempt at keris making or it is possible that it was made elsewhere. I suspect that the wrongko is an old one that has been adapted to this blade.
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Old 20th September 2020, 10:15 PM   #4
A. G. Maisey
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I cannot disagree with anything that Jean & David have said.

This must be recognised as a keris, but I feel that it really has no place in any serious collection.
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Old 21st September 2020, 08:44 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David
the lines of the pamor do not seem to follow the curves of the blade is suspect the the luks were put in place through stock removal rather than being forged that way.


Yes, good observation David!
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Old 21st September 2020, 12:35 PM   #6
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Thanks for the input guys....very helpful.
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