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Old 23rd September 2011, 07:09 PM   #1
Sajen
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Default Talibon for comment

Hello dear members,

just win this Talibon by ebay: http://www.ebay.com/itm/32076066145...984.m1439.l2649, a more simple one but by a good price and nearly complete, only one band from the scabbard is missing.
I think and hope that it is not one from this souvenir pieces from the second world war time you can see many times. What do you think about it's age and origin?

Thank you very much in advance,

Detlef
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Old 23rd September 2011, 07:17 PM   #2
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Maybe I should add that the blade is 30,5 cm long and 4 mm thick.
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Old 23rd September 2011, 07:18 PM   #3
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I was going to bid on this! But I snoozed... I guess if you snooze you lose!

Sajen, just a note, even if it is from the WWII era, I've used several vintage talibon and they tend to be decent steel and sharpen easily. Not the highest quality, but decent... they're pretty useful in the kitchen

I'm not expert, so they will speak with more authority when they see this and comment, but I my gut feeling is that it's definitely 20th century.
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Old 23rd September 2011, 08:30 PM   #4
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I'm thinking it is a really good WWII or slightly earlier example. Not a tourist piece however. They still use these, though without the ornamental carvings. I base this on the size of the blade and the quality of the wood carvings. Nice example, congratulations!
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Old 23rd September 2011, 09:57 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Battara
I'm thinking it is a really good WWII or slightly earlier example. Not a tourist piece however. They still use these, though without the ornamental carvings. I base this on the size of the blade and the quality of the wood carvings. Nice example, congratulations!



Thank you Jose, exactly this was what I think and hope. Any suggestions of the origin?

Regards,

Detlef
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Old 24th September 2011, 02:53 AM   #6
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It is from the Visayan Islands in the middle of the Philippines. Perhaps from Cebu (part of the Visayan Islands).
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Old 24th September 2011, 11:33 AM   #7
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Thank you Jose.
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Old 16th October 2011, 03:57 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Battara
It is from the Visayan Islands in the middle of the Philippines. Perhaps from Cebu (part of the Visayan Islands).


Hi Battara,

The term talibung is not used in Cebu, but it is used in Leyte and Samar. I would put money on this piece having been made in Leyte or Samar. In Cebu, similar knives are called plamingko (like flamenco in Spanish).
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Old 16th October 2011, 03:58 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Battara
It is from the Visayan Islands in the middle of the Philippines. Perhaps from Cebu (part of the Visayan Islands).


Hi Battara,

The term talibung is not used in Cebu, but it is used in Leyte and Samar. I would put money on this piece having been made in Leyte or Samar. In Cebu, similar knives are called plamingko (like flamenco in Spanish).

This may have been a WWII (or earlier) bringback, but it wasn't made specifically for a tourist to take home, which makes it a lot more attractive!
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Old 23rd September 2011, 09:55 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KuKulzA28
I was going to bid on this! But I snoozed... I guess if you snooze you lose!

Sajen, just a note, even if it is from the WWII era, I've used several vintage talibon and they tend to be decent steel and sharpen easily. Not the highest quality, but decent... they're pretty useful in the kitchen

I'm not expert, so they will speak with more authority when they see this and comment, but I my gut feeling is that it's definitely 20th century.



Thank you very much for comment. And I think byself that it is maybe from the 30s or 40s last century. But my hope is that it is one what was used and not was made for US soldiers.

Regards,

Detlef
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