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Old 27th May 2019, 06:33 PM   #1
rockelk
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Default Khanjar Omani?

I purchased this knife in Abu Dhabi. From what little Iíve read this can be categorized as a Khanjar? Any opinions as to what the hilt is made of will be appreciated.
By coincidence, while in England I visited the RAF Museum and was surprised to see a display regarding a RAF maintenance support groupís P-51 effort for the country of Oman. The Sultan had awarded them a khanjar almost identical to this one

Also the silver of the sheath is quite tarnished. Should it be cleaned / polished or left as is?

With Regards, rm
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Old 30th May 2019, 04:41 PM   #2
Jens Nordlunde
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Unfortunately I cant help with an answer, but I am surprised the no one has tried to help.
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Old 30th May 2019, 07:55 PM   #3
Bob A
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Khanjar, jambiyya :: tomato, tomahto

Whatever one chooses to call it, it's a very handsome piece. The nailhead decoration is well executed and attractive. The hilt looks like horn, but I can't really tell anything from the photo. Might even be rhino?

You will have to be the judge regarding cleaning/polishing, but I tend to lightly remove tarnish without getting extreme about digging into cracks and crevices. I've seen some completely black jambiya sheaths, and find them distressing. Making an old piece look new again is a bit insulting to my mind, but others will perhaps differ. I clean the projecting bits, and try to keep the item in an environment that slows or prevents further tarnishing.

I have an Omani khanjar that was presented to a British Lt Col by the Sultan; it is perhaps not terribly uncommon. I'd be curious to hear others' opinions on this.
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Old 30th May 2019, 09:35 PM   #4
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Thanks, I appreciate the input. rm
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Old 31st May 2019, 06:21 AM   #5
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Hello,
Really nice hilt with all these small nails !!!

Can you put a clear close up picture of the hilt ?

It seems horn ( maybe wood ?)
For rhino, the horn hilt is almost translucent.
You can test it scratching ( just a little !!) / warm a needle and smell
...
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Old 31st May 2019, 09:09 AM   #6
mariusgmioc
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This looks like a current production Omani khanjar to me. I have seen many like yours in the souks of Muscat and Nizwa. The hilt is almost certainly horn.
My two cents...
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Old 31st May 2019, 11:33 AM   #7
ALEX
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Agree with Marius. The hilt could be hardwood, hard to tell from photos. You may put the strong flashlight to the side of the hilt and see how translucent it is, if you see the light going through to the side(s) it is most likely horn. Rhino and some other horns are fibrous and the photos do not show it, perhaps it was polished(?). The blade appears to be of stamped constructions, which is normal on these Jambiyas. Overall, this Jambiya is of better than average quality, attractive and very well made. Do you see any inscriptions on it, perhaps on the back? It is in fine condition and clean, no need to polish much, just a slight oil rub should suffice. There are several Jambiya experts on this Forum and I reckon someone will add more substance soon.
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Old 31st May 2019, 05:33 PM   #8
rockelk
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Default Hilt image

Thanks for the guidance.
I made a bright small hole flashlight a could get no appearance of translucence . The material may be of a very hard hardwood. with maximum pressure I could barely create a mark with my thumbnail. I went and pulled out a number of hardwood samples and would approximate the same results of color and hardness as with Guanacaste and/or teak. I am inclined to think that it is made of a wood with the color approaching amber. Photo attached. Regards, rm
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Old 31st May 2019, 06:15 PM   #9
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Default Back of kindjar

a request of a photo of the back and a close up of the back attached as suggested. Thanks, rm
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Old 1st June 2019, 07:50 AM   #10
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
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Reference;
A. http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=14878



Hello and thank you for posting your Omani Khanjar. I have a picture of an almost exact same hilt. The Ruler often gives these weapons as gifts underlining the importance of this badge of office and Iconic item in the Omani tradition.
It is quite acceptable to get the weapon as clean as you can...if you wish. It is usually worn on a white dishdash so that if it is covered in silver oxide it would be a bit of a mess, so the locals clean it but don't be alarmed by this...It soon tarnishes and after a few months quickly reverts to its patina... The use of felt on the back is to keep it clean etc.
Deciding what the hilt is can be difficult on a foto...If it is Sandalwood it should have that perfume. Give it a rub to warm it up and smell it... If it doesn't smell of perfumed wood its not sandalwood. (I think it may be by the way)

The best test as has been already described is with a fone or powerful torch which will light up Rhino like luminous spaghetti straws.

Giraffe ( Giraffe horn called confusingly Zraff Hindi is African Giraffe) is another possible but it does not light up like rhino ..in fact it is rather dull. but takes mass silver pins in the same way as does Sandalwood! If you tried to hammer in this many silver pins into a cow horn or ordinary wooden hilt it would split!

My guess without the simple tests is.. it could be Sandalwood or Giraffe..and it could be Rhino!! and to help along the discussion I've been out and found one identical (nearly) below and for further reference you may find an answer in my thread The Omani Khanjar at Forum Library.

The one below is Giraffe.

Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Last edited by Ibrahiim al Balooshi : 1st June 2019 at 08:22 AM.
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Old 1st June 2019, 06:06 PM   #11
rockelk
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Default Giraffe

I can detect no scent of sandalwood nor the presence of hair follicles on the end of the hilt even under magnification. I am inclined to conclude giraffe bone.
I sincerely appreciate all the input that has brought me to this level of understanding which in turn creates a greater appreciation of my acquisitions.
As a side note I once traveled through Al Ain and into Oman so I must have gone through your home town. With Regards, rm
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