Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > Ethnographic Weapons
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 13th January 2021, 06:27 PM   #1
francantolin
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 534
Default Heavy/large talwar / thega sword

Hello dear members,

I wanted to share with you this big talwar / thega sword that I just received,
seems it was made for fight ,
it has ( sadly) marks/cracks on the blade.!...
I have to clean it...

I'ts a long one, 95cm / 37,5 inches long and heavy, 1,3kg / 2,9 pounds

Is it usual to see such long/ large pieces ?

the seller told me it was more than one meter long but it's still a nice catch


The large blade has a yelman, the thick blade structure is really thin and sharp after the yelman at the end/tip of the blade.


The hilt seems made of a single iron piece and there is an interesting stamp at the basis of the blade,
does anyone know where it can come from ?

An old mughal model ? 19th or 18th century ?

Kind regards
Attached Images
   
francantolin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th January 2021, 06:29 PM   #2
francantolin
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 534
Default

mark on the blade / yelman...
Attached Images
    
francantolin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th January 2021, 07:13 PM   #3
Kmaddock
Member
 
Kmaddock's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Ireland
Posts: 380
Default

Hi

Nice item alright but mine is bigger ;-)

see this thread

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=26169


They would be a good pairing. There are no markings on mine at all. I have since cleaned it up and should put up a few pictures, there is some information on the thread I started about possible origins of such large swords also.

Regards and keep well,

Ken
Kmaddock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th January 2021, 08:01 PM   #4
francantolin
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 534
Thumbs up



Really Nice !
Congrats !!
francantolin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th January 2021, 11:11 AM   #5
francantolin
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 534
Default

Does anybody know the ''flower'' stamp of the blade ?

a family / regional stamp
or an arsenal mark ?

For the blade, do you think an etching can be useful ?
francantolin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th January 2021, 03:25 PM   #6
corrado26
Member
 
corrado26's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Black Forest, Germany
Posts: 901
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by francantolin

For the blade, do you think an etching can be useful ?


After my opinion an etching of an old blade can never be useful, it detracts from the value of the whole piece and takes off its longtime preserved original condition!
corrado26 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th January 2021, 04:15 PM   #7
Jim McDougall
Arms Historian
 
Jim McDougall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Route 66
Posts: 8,085
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by corrado26
After my opinion an etching of an old blade can never be useful, it detracts from the value of the whole piece and takes off its longtime preserved original condition!



Amen!!! and hallelujah! That exactly says it all Udo!
from an arms historian view, that patina is well earned, and pretty much history itself. Aside from stabilizing active corrosion, and minimal repair to damage the rest should be left alone.
The reason I always collected weapons in often rough condition was that I knew they had not been 'dolled up' by dealers, and I could see them as they were in situ in their time. This is important in learning from a forensics point of view, and as I appreciated them 'as they were' and was not displaying them, it was a good arrangement. I call them my 'old warriors'

The 'flower' stamp probably represents a lotus, and is in a strategic position on a tulwar blade, in the upper, ricasso quadrant to left of langet seen on many NW Indian tulwars. Often these are cartouches having Urdu script, and other devices.
There is no definitive compendium of Indian markings for arsenals, but these do not seem to be those, and Indian makers as far as I have known seldom place personal marks.
These seem more a kind of state or perhaps imbuement of some sort given the consistent placement in same location on blade.
Jim McDougall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th January 2021, 04:32 PM   #8
Jim McDougall
Arms Historian
 
Jim McDougall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Route 66
Posts: 8,085
Default

Here are some stamps of similar nature.
The first is thought to be from perhaps Gujerat and the Kattee people who use the katar as a key symbol of state. The trisula is of course an important Hindu symbol.

Next is a tulwar with the upper ricasso quadrant stamp, I believe Urdu cartouche and the trisula again in key blade location.

Next a tulwar with possbly Urdu cartouche and close up in next image.

Next a khanda with katar and trisula .
Attached Images
     
Jim McDougall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th January 2021, 05:56 PM   #9
mariusgmioc
Member
 
mariusgmioc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 1,620
Default

The blade looks 19th century Indian.

Etching only makes sense if it is wootz or pattern welded.
mariusgmioc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th January 2021, 06:49 PM   #10
Will M
Member
 
Will M's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: In the wee woods north of Napanee Ontario
Posts: 277
Default

You described the blade with having "marks,cracks" When new these blades would not show defects in their manufacture but with repeat corrosion and cleanings these marks begin to appear which proves it is an authentic blade.
I have one Tegha sword with a "T" back section, curved heavy blade and has eye lash markings. Many variations within the type makes collecting interesting.
Will M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd January 2021, 01:05 PM   #11
francantolin
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 534
Default

Hello,
Thank you all,
specially Jim for all your precious informations ,

I wanted to show you the sword ''cleaned'' a little (sorry for the late answer !)
I didn't like the way it was kept before:
It was to shiny on some parts and a lot of rust deposit on other + scratches of big grain sandpaper on the blade...
I just made it more homogeneous using sand paper 400 to 1000 with WD40,
( and a lot of patience

I think it's better, in respect to this nice old weapon !!
I'll have to find someone for make a new scabbard
Attached Images
     
francantolin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd January 2021, 05:58 PM   #12
Will M
Member
 
Will M's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: In the wee woods north of Napanee Ontario
Posts: 277
Default

Your blade tip photo makes me wonder if an acid etch would bring out a pattern in the steel? If not it does not take much to reverse the look.
Will M is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 05:56 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.