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Old 17th January 2020, 10:45 PM   #1
bvieira
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Default Angola sword

Hello,

Got this sword, named as Angola tribal sword, 19 century, copy of the Portuguese xvi century swords.

Would like a opinion please.

Tks!

Bruno
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Old 17th January 2020, 11:31 PM   #2
ariel
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The blade looks like crude copy of the Spanish cavalry sword 1728 pattern. The hexagonal profile and the narrowed ricasso make me think of it.
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Old 18th January 2020, 07:14 AM   #3
Kubur
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Buono dia
First i like your sword and it's the first time that i see one with a scabbard.
We have some experts of this kind of sword on the forum but here is what i see: the blade as Ariel said looks strange, then the guard has 3 branches instead of 4 and is in brass instead of steel.
In short it's a nice sword, probably from Angola but may be from the early 20th c.
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Old 18th January 2020, 10:13 AM   #4
bvieira
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Thank you Ariel and Kubur!

Some more pictures of the blade. The blade is heavy and feels strong, it's less width than the 1728 Spanish cavalary sword but it's thicker. It's sharp too.

Regards,

Bruno
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Old 18th January 2020, 12:38 PM   #5
Edster
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Question: why would the bladesmith cut the relatively deep and sharp notches at the ricasso? It seems to me that they create points of stress concentration and invite the blade to break with a heavy strike. Did the notches serve another purpose?

Thanks,
Ed
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Old 18th January 2020, 07:09 PM   #6
bvieira
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edster
Question: why would the bladesmith cut the relatively deep and sharp notches at the ricasso? It seems to me that they create points of stress concentration and invite the blade to break with a heavy strike. Did the notches serve another purpose?

Thanks,
Ed

Hello Edster,

Maybe the blade was from another older sword ?

Regards,

Bruno
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Old 18th January 2020, 08:58 PM   #7
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The deep and sharp notches were made with a saw and not forged to imitate the upper part "ricasso" of a rapier, but normaly this part is thiner than the blade like a tang... It is the reason why this blade is very suspicious...

THE reference
http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...ighlight=angola

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...ght=kongo+sword

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=23464

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...ighlight=angola
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