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Old 18th December 2014, 04:19 PM   #1
CharlesS
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Default Qajar Era Ceremonial Choppers/Axes

I acquired these two very unique Qajar era all steel axes/choppers recently. I have never seen anything quite like them. At first glance I thought they were Indian bhujs.

Apparently these are ceremonial things and are another in a long line of fakir(holy man) weapons that are mostly for looks. Please see the pic below.

While they are almost certainly ceremonial, they are also fit weapons, most especially the shorter one, which is quite heavy and features a thick blade. Neither piece is particularly well balanced.

Note the decent quality of the typically Qajar era chiseling on the longer one, which is also decorated in gold koftgari. The silver koftgari on the all steel haft is rather crudely applied.

The shorter one also had some gold koftgari to the top of the blade's sides, but most of it has been lost. The chiseling here is superior, at least to my eye.

Dimensions:

Top example: 32in. overall, with a 18.5in. blade that is 2in. wide at its widest point.

Bottom example: 24.5in. overall, with a 12in. blade that is 2.5in. wide at its widest point.

The photo of a man standing with a similar piece was provided by Runjeet Singh via Eric Tulin. Thanks to both!
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Last edited by CharlesS : 19th December 2014 at 11:21 AM.
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Old 19th December 2014, 04:14 AM   #2
A.alnakkas
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very interesting weapons! first time I see them.. If you notice the weapon in the old photo, the construction is different, especially how the blade is attached to the shaft. I wonder if there are other battle worthy examples out there.
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Old 19th December 2014, 08:06 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A.alnakkas
... especially how the blade is attached to the shaft. ...



the poor blade/shaft weld doesn't fill me with confidence it could survive actual use.
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Old 19th December 2014, 09:43 AM   #4
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Default very differnt

THESE ARE VINTAGE 25 YEARS PLUS ,BUT LOOK GOOD ,NEVER SEEN SOMETHING LIKE THESE,GOOD CRAFTMANSHIP
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Old 19th December 2014, 11:04 AM   #5
Runjeet Singh
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Hi Charles,

The Dervish pic credit I believe belongs to Eric from this forum - "Estrch". I had it saved, and I think it was Eric who sent it to me.

Regarding the real use of these weapons, I believe they would be fine for 'civilian' use. I would not want to be hit by one!! But perhaps the other forum members are right too, they would not stand a heavy battle.

You have them in your hands Charles, what's your opinion?

Regards
Runjeet
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Old 19th December 2014, 12:29 PM   #6
estcrh
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So now there are four known images of these weapons, it is interesting that they have been able to remain hidden. There must be some more information on them somewere.
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Old 19th December 2014, 01:18 PM   #7
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Another one that is somewhat similar at least in the idea of it.
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Old 19th December 2014, 01:29 PM   #8
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As stated, the ones in the period photos look to be more substantially made. With the welds being so obvious, and not very well dressed, I'm thinking the ones shown here, are either ceremonial, or purely older tourista examples. None the less, very attractive weapons.
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Old 20th December 2014, 06:29 AM   #9
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I wonder if those dervish poleaxes are specific to a certain tasavvufi order in Iran?
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Old 23rd December 2014, 07:08 AM   #10
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlesS
Another one that is somewhat similar at least in the idea of it.



Salaams Charles S , Here you picture exactly the apparel worn by Suffi Dervish including the Begging Bowl (KashKull) and the prayer beads...
Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 15th January 2020, 05:32 PM   #11
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Let me add another one found recently...
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