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Old 2nd October 2018, 03:02 AM   #1
Rafngard
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Default A new (to me) mid-20th cent(?) gunong

Hello All!

A few pics of a new gunong. I want to say that this style is 1950s-1960?
The scabbard is wood covered in three metal sections. The top and bottom sections seem to be silver plated copper. The middle section, which I think is not original, might be actual silver.

I attempted a light etch on this, and I think I see signs of lamination, but I'm not sure. I'm not very good at etching yet.

Also, the two sections on either side of the granulation work bulb on the hilt seem to be a different color of metal. I'm wondering if these are maybe something like Swassa?

I'm also including family photos. The Gunong itch has me bad.

Enjoy, and as always, any comments or opinions are welcome!

Thanks,
Leif
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Old 2nd October 2018, 03:11 AM   #2
Ian
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Hi Leif:

Nice pictures of the family and it is getting quite large. You may become the next "tito gunong."

Your newest addition is a nice clean example of its type, and maybe a little older than mid-20th C. The pinker metal you describe is probably a copper alloy, maybe silver-copper and probably not suassa which contains gold.

Ian.
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Old 2nd October 2018, 03:14 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian
Nice pictures of the family and it is getting quite large. You may become the next "tito gunong."


Tito gunong feels a little presumptuous.
Google translate gives "pamangkin" for "nephew," so maybe I could accept pamangkin gunong. ;-)

Thanks,
Leif
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Old 2nd October 2018, 03:16 AM   #4
Ian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rafngard
Tito gunong feels a little presumptuous.
Google translate gives "pamangkin" for "nephew," so maybe I could accept pamangkin gunong. ;-)

Thanks,
Leif
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Old 2nd October 2018, 01:12 PM   #5
mariusgmioc
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Very nice gunong. I don't think the exact age is very important (but I agree with your estimation) as long as it is a good traditional piece.

I would definitely not etch the blade as
1. I do not think they are traditionally supposed to be etched,
2. I do not see any estethical benefit from etching it.
But it is your blade, your call.

Wow... quite a big family you have!
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Old 2nd October 2018, 06:24 PM   #6
kronckew
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That's a nice traditional gunong.

THIS is a modern late 20c version of mine: Yours looks positively ancient in comparison
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Old 2nd October 2018, 08:52 PM   #7
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Hi Leif,
very nice big gunong! Like Ian I think that it is older, around 1930s would be my guess, compare size and quality with your example on the complete left from your family picture. And I guess that the plain rings at the handle are indeed from suassa, let test it if there is gold content.
Here a very similar (in blade style) examples from my collection:
http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showp...580&postcount=6
In the meanwhile I've acquired another one with the same blade style.

Regards,
Detlef
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Old 2nd October 2018, 09:04 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mariusgmioc
I would definitely not etch the blade as
1. I do not think they are traditionally supposed to be etched,
2. I do not see any estethical benefit from etching it.


Hello Marius,
by this blade style with engraving in up I would agree with you since I've never seen one with laminated blade.
But do you think that this blade of a gunong hasn't benefit from an etch:
http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showp...51&postcount=41 ?

Regards,
Detlef
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Old 5th October 2018, 04:04 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sajen
Like Ian I think that it is older, around 1930s would be my guess, compare size and quality with your example on the complete left from your family picture.


Hello Detlef, Do you think those two are from the same time period?
I had thought the one on the left (with the MOP milt) a little latter, but you definitely know better than I.

And yes! The blade of yours especially is similar to mine! They could be cousins.

Thanks,
Leif
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Old 5th October 2018, 04:06 AM   #10
Rafngard
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mariusgmioc
Very nice gunong. I don't think the exact age is very important (but I agree with your estimation) as long as it is a good traditional piece.

I would definitely not etch the blade as
1. I do not think they are traditionally supposed to be etched,
2. I do not see any estethical benefit from etching it.
But it is your blade, your call.

Wow... quite a big family you have!


Thanks Marius!

The lack of etching, do you think that's true of older ones also? I thought there was some evidence of Moros etching their blades with limes after leaving them in the hot sun.

Thanks,
Leif
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Old 6th October 2018, 07:59 AM   #11
mariusgmioc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sajen
Hello Marius,
by this blade style with engraving in up I would agree with you since I've never seen one with laminated blade.
But do you think that this blade of a gunong hasn't benefit from an etch:
http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showp...51&postcount=41 ?

Regards,
Detlef


Very interesting! In the case youbprovided the link, the etching revealed a nice pattern, and this is a certain benefit.

Thank you
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Old 6th October 2018, 08:00 AM   #12
mariusgmioc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rafngard
Thanks Marius!

The lack of etching, do you think that's true of older ones also? I thought there was some evidence of Moros etching their blades with limes after leaving them in the hot sun.

Thanks,
Leif


I cannot say for sure.
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Old 6th October 2018, 10:41 AM   #13
Sajen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rafngard
Hello Detlef, Do you think those two are from the same time period?


Hello Leif,

yes, I think that this both nice gunongs are from the same time frame, look to the very similar scabbard construction, belt loop, three part cover and so on.

Regards,
Detlef
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