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Old 7th July 2017, 07:59 PM   #31
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Bow Ranges~

I was looking at a comparison in Bow ranges and comparing the English Longbow to others...including the Turkish Foot Bow...which I assume is called that because of the need to use your foot to press on the bow in order to apply sufficient force to bend it so as top apply the bowstring...The amazing range of the latter weapon was never tested against the English Bow but achieved far longer range distances and easily plus of 400 yards and refined with modern methods to nearly double that today...

See http://www.turkishculture.org/lifes...-554.htm?type=1

The detail whilst placed here for the Boffins out there is interesting not least in the peculiar shape of the Bows but also the aerodynamic type of Arrows used in the Turkish example...



For interest and Library I place books on Archery as I have done for Ethnographic...The Blue book and the book with the Arab archer are the same with the latter as a reprint. The Other book is the European relevant book... all placed for comparison and interest.
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Old 9th July 2017, 02:52 PM   #32
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Hello Fernando, the posts of ms illustrations by Ibrahiim and yourself is brilliant - thank you. I am currently researching 2-hand swords and noticed a couple of good images among your posts, especially the last image in #7 and the first in #8 (17-18 June). I assume they are both from a ms of Froissart's chronicles; do you have an exact reference for them? or even better a higher resolution photo which I could use. I already have the earlier one from the Jean de Wavrin chronicle, but not these. I would be most grateful for any help you can give me.
Kind regards, Neil
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Old 9th July 2017, 04:06 PM   #33
fernando
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Hi Neil,
I don't keep an organized file on this material as i have edited the images for saving and uploading and the original data is gonne. I would advance however that, the two images you refer are also from Wavrin's chronicle. The source i picked them from is the chronicle itself and has no higher resolution; but there is an optional zoom in the page that i ignore if it compensates to switch.
You can see for yourself HERE

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Old 10th July 2017, 12:27 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilUK
Hello Fernando, the posts of ms illustrations by Ibrahiim and yourself is brilliant - thank you. I am currently researching 2-hand swords and noticed a couple of good images among your posts, especially the last image in #7 and the first in #8 (17-18 June). I assume they are both from a ms of Froissart's chronicles; do you have an exact reference for them? or even better a higher resolution photo which I could use. I already have the earlier one from the Jean de Wavrin chronicle, but not these. I would be most grateful for any help you can give me.
Kind regards, Neil



Salaams NeilUK~ Thank you for your kind comments about the Medieval Thread. Actually I was looking at a good website on Two Handed swords http://www.thearma.org/essays/2HGS.html#.WWLJCmKGPIU

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Old 10th July 2017, 12:41 AM   #35
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There is a very good website at

http://www.historyextra.com/article...icant-agincourt

which states that there are 9 more important medieval battles than Agincourt.... and which I commend to members.

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Old 10th July 2017, 02:16 AM   #36
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Now to look at Medieval Seige Engines ... Trebuchet.

A huge team of engineers using medieval methodology was gathered together and against the backdrop of Loch Ness in Scotland they carried out a test firing having constructed two mighty seige weapons ... Trebuchet... against a 5 feet thick stone wall built for the experiment about 250 yards down range....using 250 pounder stone balls... would it work?

See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N0wnOO4U-yg and watch what happened.

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Old 10th July 2017, 05:16 AM   #37
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I suspect not many people know this~

Origin of the term 'Pell Mell'
The true origin of the term 'Pell Mell' has become somewhat confused over the passing of time. The name has its origins in France. The old French word “pallemaille” means “ball and mallet” and comes from the Latin “pallamaglio” ('palla' meaning a ball and 'maglio' meaning a mallet). Another French word “pêle-mêle”, meaning to mix. Pell Mell was given as the name to an old English game which was played using a mallet and a large wooden. The current definition of 'Pell Mell' is 'in mingled confusion or disorder'.

The Game of Pell Mell
Pell Mell was a name given to a rough Medieval game. The players of Pell Mell drove the ball along the Pell Mell playing area by taking immense swings at it with a mallet. They then had to shoot the ball through a suspended hoop at the end of the field. The term Pell Mell was changed in translation and gave name to the famous London Road called Pall Mall where the game Pell Mell was played! Samuel Pepys wrote in his diary for 2nd April 1661: “So I into St. James’s Park, where I saw the Duke of York playing at Pelemele, the first time that ever I saw the sport.”

The Origin of the Game of Pell Mell

A connection can be made with Pell Mell and the training of Medieval Knights. The knights of the Middle Ages practised "Running at the Rings" where their skill at using the lance weapon was practised. The lance was aimed at a target in the shape of a ring - "Running at the Rings". The term 'Mêlée' was closely associated with jousting and knights. Mêlée: A Melee was a team combat or ‘free for all’ where teams or groups of individuals met in the field. The current definition of 'Pell Mell' is 'in mingled confusion or disorder'. It is quite conceivable that the game 'Pell Mell' was a spin-off from Quintain and Pell Training! A great form of entertainment for knights and soldiers during the Medieval period of the Middle Ages.

It appears to have been exported as a word entering the American dictionary for a large shopping centre. The Mall.
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Old 10th July 2017, 03:02 PM   #38
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Many thanks to Fernando and Ibrahiim. I already know of the 'Arma' article and unfortunately I could not open the link suggested by Fernando. On comparing the posts I agree that the images which interest me are all likely to be from the Wavrin chronicle, which I think is BNF ms fr 87. But Google seems unable to find that reference. Nothing is perfect in this world, not even the internet!
Thanks anyway to all.
Regards, Neil
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Old 10th July 2017, 03:56 PM   #39
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There was one letter missing in the URL of the link i posted, Neil; try again.
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Old 10th July 2017, 10:44 PM   #40
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Thanks, Fernando. It worked this time.
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