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Old 23rd July 2019, 07:28 AM   #1
Amuk Murugul
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Default DOEHOENG KASOENDAN (A Soenda Perspective)

Hullo everybody!

Below is a poesaka (=heirloom) to share:

. Doehoeng Asgar

Name: Kangdjeng Wangsa Dita(=symbolises links to Limbangan and Soemedang)
Desc: Doehoeng Sampana 5 Eloek(= symbolises as belonging to the hereditary boepati-class) LIMBANGAN
Char: 5 Eloek , Kembang-katjang
Blade: LxOALxWxT=34.5x41x7.93x1.06cm. GALOEH PANGAOEBAN (=symbolises link to Galoeh)
Handle: Wood, Pralamba Jaksa Tjakra(=devastating energy)
Wt: 170g.
Sheath: Wood, Widjajan(=symbolises a very old family-tree); white-metal o/sheath w/ frontal pierced designs incl.1813
Comments: Taroem(=indigo) is traditionally identified with Soenda, hence the band.
16/02 1813 - British lieutenant-governor Stamford Raffles directed the regent of Limbangan to survey possible sites for a new capital city for Limbangan. Once the site and name for the new city had been determined, the Garoet Construction Committee was named.
15/09 1813 - first foundation-stone laid for construction of city of Garoet, to replace Soetji as capital of Limbangan regency.
07/05 1913 - Dutch Governor-general dissolves Limbangan regency and replaces it with a newly-created Garoet regency, w/ Garoet as its capital.
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Old 23rd July 2019, 07:31 AM   #2
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Default Three basic pieces just to share:

00. TilamOepih Lempeng (SandangWalikat, Tjorok)

Name: Sang Kamandaka
Desc: Doehoeng Tilam Oepih Lempeng PASIR LOEHOER
Char: Oepih-rai , Elis , Lempeng
Blade: LxOALxWxT=46x53.5x9.16x1.47cm.(paksi: 0.98x7.16x0.80cm.)
Handle: Wood, Ganaisia(lord of the ganadewatas) w/ white-metal wewer & yellow-metal seloet
Wt: 513g.
Sheath: Wood, Korakoran
Comments: SandangWalikat: worn over shoulder-blade; Tjorok: can act as backup sword .


01. TilamSari Lempeng
(SandangWalikat,Tjorok)

Name: Sang Sasaka Domas
Desc: Doehoeng Tilam Sari Lempeng SOENDA SEMBAWA
Char: Oepih , Elis , Lempeng .
Blade: LxOALxWxT=43x51x9.42x1.49cm.(paksi: 1.05x7.52x1.14cm.)
Handle: Wood, Ganaisia w/ yellow-metal seloet
Wt: 443g.
Sheath: Wood, Djongan


02. TilamSari Lempeng (Tjorok)

Name: Sang Banjaran Sari
Desc: Doehoeng TilamSari Lempeng TJAROEBAN
Char: Oepih , Elis , Lempeng .
Blade: LxOALxWxT=38x46x8.22x1.36cm. (paksi: 0.76x7.49x0.45cm.)
Wt: 274g
Handle: Wood, Babandolan(=tough, wild pig) w/ white-metal seloet
Sheath: Wood Saridjong w/ pressed white-metal o/sheath
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Old 23rd July 2019, 12:43 PM   #3
Jean
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Hello Amuk,
Thank you very much for showing us these nice and rare pieces, please go on!
I notice that you use the letters "oe" instead of "u" and "tj" instead of "c" as per the old tradition, is "tjorok/ corok" referring to a long blade?
Best regards
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Old 23rd July 2019, 12:48 PM   #4
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Hello Amuk,
The gambar/ atasan of the pusaka kris looks like a rare model from East Java/ Madura, the one of specimen 00 a model from Tegal, and the one of specimen 02 a model from East Java, are they all originating from Sunda?
Regards

Last edited by Jean : 23rd July 2019 at 02:56 PM.
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Old 23rd July 2019, 08:09 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean
I notice that you use the letters "oe" instead of "u" and "tj" instead of "c" as per the old tradition, is "tjorok/ corok" referring to a long blade?

Yes Jean, Amuk generally seems to use the old Dutch spellings that have fallen out of usage in Indonesia since the early 1970s. I do find it a bit confusing at times myself.
I assume, Amuk, that when you write "Doehoeng" you are intenting one of the alternative words for keris better known as "Dhuwung"?
An interesting collection of old keris in lesser seen dress forms regardless.
Does anyone of a translation of the writing at the top of the pendok on the first (1813) keris?
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Old 25th July 2019, 05:08 AM   #6
A. G. Maisey
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David, I have no knowledge of the Sundanese language, however, I have recently made the acquaintance of a gentleman from Sunda who was a university lecturer, he tells me that "duhung" ie, Amuk's "doehoeng" is in fact not a direct equivalent to the Javanese "duwung" or "dhuwung", but rather can only be used to refer to a keris that is in the possession of an important man, somebody with some sort of government rank, or who is recognised in his community as being of high status.

If that keris were to become the possession of somebody who was not a person of importance, then strictly speaking, it could no longer be referred to as "duhung".

Thus, all these keris that Amuk has shown to us must be keris that belong at this present time to a person of some status.
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Old 25th July 2019, 08:46 AM   #7
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It seems to me that Amuk is only referring the first kris (poesaka) as doehoeng but not the others.
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Old 25th July 2019, 09:02 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A. G. Maisey
David, I have no knowledge of the Sundanese language, however, I have recently made the acquaintance of a gentleman from Sunda who was a university lecturer, he tells me that "duhung" ie, Amuk's "doehoeng" is in fact not a direct equivalent to the Javanese "duwung" or "dhuwung", but rather can only be used to refer to a keris that is in the possession of an important man, somebody with some sort of government rank, or who is recognised in his community as being of high status.

If that keris were to become the possession of somebody who was not a person of importance, then strictly speaking, it could no longer be referred to as "duhung".

Thus, all these keris that Amuk has shown to us must be keris that belong at this present time to a person of some status.

Thanks for that added information Alan.
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Old 13th August 2019, 12:46 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A. G. Maisey
David, I have no knowledge of the Sundanese language, however, I have recently made the acquaintance of a gentleman from Sunda who was a university lecturer, he tells me that "duhung" ie, Amuk's "doehoeng" is in fact not a direct equivalent to the Javanese "duwung" or "dhuwung", but rather can only be used to refer to a keris that is in the possession of an important man, somebody with some sort of government rank, or who is recognised in his community as being of high status.

If that keris were to become the possession of somebody who was not a person of importance, then strictly speaking, it could no longer be referred to as "duhung".

Thus, all these keris that Amuk has shown to us must be keris that belong at this present time to a person of some status.


As with Javanese, Sundanese has high and low forms, i.e. kasar (loosely translate to coarse, rough, abrasive, harsh) or halus (loosely translated to proper, polished, refine). To my understanding, "keris" is on the kasar end of the spectrum though wouldn't necessarily register as kasar if you referred to your own keris or referring to the object abstractly as "keris". Though the halus or proper term for another person's keris, especially if they were high born or were had rank or status would indeed be duhung. That's my understanding of it anyway. I think the term is relatively archaic as far as working Sundanese goes.

So in the context of this post and to what Alan's friend from Sunda said, it makes sense that in the Sundanese language that these are referred to as duhung as opposed to just "keris". You would probably not refer to your own keris as a "duhung" though, even if you were of high status.

Last edited by jagabuwana : 14th August 2019 at 02:15 AM.
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