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Old 23rd June 2022, 07:04 AM   #1
naturalist
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Default Ceker Kidang variation? Some said not - Pedang

Some said the handle is in "belutan" style.
In original sheath and handle.
The handle, sopal (see the last picture, marked with 2), and simpay are from water buffalo horn.
This particular blade is known to always have poison. (I am still thinking to clean the blade or just leave in as it is).
No 1 in last picture is a hole at the handle that is sealed with unknown material. Some people believe it is where the antidote is placed.
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Old 25th June 2022, 05:16 AM   #2
Amuk Murugul
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Originally Posted by naturalist View Post
Some said the handle is in "belutan" style.
In original sheath and handle.
The handle, sopal (see the last picture, marked with 2), and simpay are from water buffalo horn.
This particular blade is known to always have poison. (I am still thinking to clean the blade or just leave in as it is).
No 1 in last picture is a hole at the handle that is sealed with unknown material. Some people believe it is where the antidote is placed.
Hullo naturalist!

“belutan” = eel-like.

Of course, as the owner of the piece, you have the right to name the handle as you will.
However, I follow a “pakem” that dates back to at least the the 12th.C.
In the absence of data “from the horse’s mouth”, please consider whether you can reconcile the “perah” with a stylised “makara”, “ceker kidang”, or a “belut” (or perhaps, indeed, with something else).

Best,
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Old 29th June 2022, 11:41 PM   #3
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Ki Amuk, thank you so much again, definitely i need to learn more from you. Also, i found it difficult to find reading materials written by our ancestors. I will be very happy if i could access your library
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Hullo naturalist!

“belutan” = eel-like.

Of course, as the owner of the piece, you have the right to name the handle as you will.
However, I follow a “pakem” that dates back to at least the the 12th.C.
In the absence of data “from the horse’s mouth”, please consider whether you can reconcile the “perah” with a stylised “makara”, “ceker kidang”, or a “belut” (or perhaps, indeed, with something else).

Best,
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Old 30th June 2022, 05:57 AM   #4
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Ki Amuk, thank you so much again, definitely i need to learn more from you. Also, i found it difficult to find reading materials written by our ancestors. I will be very happy if i could access your library
Hullo naturalist!

I will agree that reading materials are rather hard to find.
Soenda "cosmology" is a bit like a jigsaw puzzle. Usually one (or more) piece(s) is(are) under the guardianship of a custodian (koentjén). (A bit like Australian First Nations' custodians of "Song-Lines".)
However, sometimes, the koentjén has no idea/understanding of what they have in their possession. It then becomes the task of people who "know" to seek them out and understand such pieces, "joining" them onto other pieces that are already known, to try and get a more complete picture.
Heirloom manuscripts/relics were looked after according to:
"Moelija na koelit lasoen di djarjan, madan na radjapoetra, antoek na beunang koe sakalih." (A mongoose skin in a rubbish dump is the worth of a prince who allows "heritage" to fall to others.)

By all means, post any related questions you may have on this forum and I'll try to answer them.

Best,

Last edited by Amuk Murugul; 30th June 2022 at 08:53 AM. Reason: correction
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Old 14th July 2022, 08:59 AM   #5
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Default Tjékér Kidang

Hullo naturalist!

FYI ..... By way of example, the item on the left (see attached photo) has what I would call a classic Tjékér Kidang.
Enjoy!

Best,
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Old 16th July 2022, 06:10 AM   #6
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Hello Amuk.

Your sword in the center of your last picture looks like a Moro bangkung. Do you know where it is from?

Regards,

Ian
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Old 16th July 2022, 01:40 PM   #7
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Hello Amuk.

Your sword in the center of your last picture looks like a Moro bangkung. Do you know where it is from?

Regards,

Ian
Hullo Ian:

The item you refer to is a golok beubeut-njéré/bandoel/lamang from Soenda (western Java).
It has a stereotypical djéngkol-sahoeloe handle (the "nodule" appearing to jut out from the top of the "pommel" is actually a trick of the lighting).
The blade is of "higher" quality and designed to be strong and light, but primarily for use as a chopper.

Best,
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Old 17th July 2022, 02:41 PM   #8
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Quote:
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...
The blade is of "higher" quality and designed to be strong and light, but primarily for use as a chopper. ...
Similar characteristics to a Moro bangkung. Parallel development or one culture adopting from another? Even the long silver ferrule looks like a Moro punto.
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Old 19th July 2022, 02:38 AM   #9
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Ian I was thinking the same thing! Could have fooled me (and did).

On a second glance however, the "belly" of the middle blade is not straight but slightly curved or convex at the edge. Moro banking are usually straight at the edge.

Still love it and the double twist core.
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