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Old 26th July 2020, 08:41 PM   #1
RSWORD
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Default Small Keris with interesting handle

This Keris was interesting to me because of the handle material. It looks like Agate which doesn’t seem to common in Keris hilts. I understand these small pieces to be amulets or even talismanic in nature. Is that correct? Blade seems shaped like a Wayang figure, at least an abstract one and has some etched inscriptions done in a circle that might have some meaning. Thanks for having a look and sharing comments or thoughts.
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Old 26th July 2020, 09:31 PM   #2
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This is an interesting item, truly, but it is not a keris.

The figure is Semar. To do justice to an explanation of Semar would require many more words than could be justified in a forum dealing with the keris. Here is a short, simple explanation that does not even come close to providing an understanding of Semar, but it is an easy place to start.

https://wepa.unima.org/en/semar/

Semar is The Soul of Jawa, and a very popular talismanic icon.

The hilt probably is agate, in the Mangkunegaraan in Solo there is a display of small daggers with agate hilts that are believed to have been in the possession of female abdi dalem (court attendants). Solo has a long history in lapidary work, and polished stones are very popular in Central Jawa.

I would be inclined to attribute this piece to Solo, late Colonial era.
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Old 27th July 2020, 06:47 AM   #3
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another one
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Old 27th July 2020, 01:08 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A. G. Maisey
This is an interesting item, truly, but it is not a keris.

The figure is Semar. To do justice to an explanation of Semar would require many more words than could be justified in a forum dealing with the keris. Here is a short, simple explanation that does not even come close to providing an understanding of Semar, but it is an easy place to start.

https://wepa.unima.org/en/semar/

Semar is The Soul of Jawa, and a very popular talismanic icon.

The hilt probably is agate, in the Mangkunegaraan in Solo there is a display of small daggers with agate hilts that are believed to have been in the possession of female abdi dalem (court attendants). Solo has a long history in lapidary work, and polished stones are very popular in Central Jawa.

I would be inclined to attribute this piece to Solo, late Colonial era.


Thank you for the information Alan.
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Old 27th July 2020, 01:08 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcokeris
another one


Thank you for sharing. Very nice.
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Old 28th July 2020, 01:48 AM   #6
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Another interesting item. The hilt has a simplistic beauty. But again, as Alan has pointed out, not a keris.
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Old 29th July 2020, 02:29 PM   #7
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the writing says

Ya Allah
Ya Muhammad
Ya nabi (prophet)

on the other side is a a verse from the Qur'an sura 36: 58

Peace (Salam) fron a lord most merciful.

This sura is considered to be the 'heart' of the Quran and is recited when people are in situation of great stress or when a person is at near death . And recited after a person is dead.

The verse 58 is a very wellknown one and often repeated as a form of prayer.

This is quite interesting. a fusion of hindu figure with muslim prayer...
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Old 29th July 2020, 06:43 PM   #8
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Iki Jowo.
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Old 29th July 2020, 08:37 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Green
This is quite interesting. a fusion of hindu figure with muslim prayer...

As i believe Alan was pointing out in his last post (Iki Jowo), this is a fairly common occurrence for Jawa. The influence of past cultures that once dominated the area remain and are mixed and synthesized for present day Islam.
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Old 29th July 2020, 08:39 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A. G. Maisey
Iki Jowo.



Hello Alan,

Only our Javanese friends will understand what you mean.

So far I know it's Javanese and mean Javanese Style. Agree complete!

Regards,
Detlef

PS: Just see that I was wrong!
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Old 30th July 2020, 12:58 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Green
the writing says

Ya Allah
Ya Muhammad
Ya nabi (prophet)

on the other side is a a verse from the Qur'an sura 36: 58

Peace (Salam) fron a lord most merciful.

This sura is considered to be the 'heart' of the Quran and is recited when people are in situation of great stress or when a person is at near death . And recited after a person is dead.

The verse 58 is a very wellknown one and often repeated as a form of prayer.

This is quite interesting. a fusion of hindu figure with muslim prayer...



Thank you for the translation. It is much appreciated.
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Old 30th July 2020, 08:15 PM   #12
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"Iki Jowo" = "This is Java".

If we were to be using Bahasa Indonesia it would be:- "Ini Jawa"

and this sort of thing is truly Java;- layer after layer after layer of societal/cultural/religious style and belief.

With Java it has never been a matter of "instead of", it has always been "as well as".

The Javanese person has in his heart the standards and beliefs of his indigenous ancestors, over which are layers of Hindu/Buddhist/Muslim and sometimes even Christian belief.

One can never have too many Gods, nor too many layers of protection.
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