Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > European Armoury
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 17th October 2019, 01:22 PM   #1
Ed
Member
 
Ed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 175
Default 16th c. German Dopplehacken

I bought this via ebay some years ago (10 maybe?).



Length ~44"
Weight
Bore ~ 1.25"

When I got it I found that it was loaded with a charge of BP. I flushed it and captured some of the powder which, upon being dried, combusted fitfully (that is a good way of putting it actually).

I had a long discussion with Tromner about it. He noted that there were remains of paint which show up on the images but are almost invisible to the naked eye. The colors are red and green which, Michael informed me, were/are the colors of Nuremberg.

I am sorry that I didn't save the listing from ebay. It was identified as a french ships cannon that was excavated.

I built a simple carriage for it

The center part is simply made of glued plywood, the model for it is a model that I own.

As far as shooting it. I suspect that the load would be ~ 120grains of Fg or FFg powder. If I were shooting it I'd start at ~60 grains and work my way up using the old sheet trick.

While I suspect the thing is ok, I would get it x-rayed before I'd do any serious shooting. I might just toss 30grains in it for a hoot.

Michael gave me a comprehensive assessment which I will post. I need to edit it a bit.
Attached Images
     
Ed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st January 2020, 07:15 PM   #2
Lansquenet59
Member
 
Lansquenet59's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: France
Posts: 50
Default

Hello, I have a piece of the same kind! Mine comes from a castle in Belgium whose name I forgot. The gardener of the castle who was to clear the contents of a cellar, sold lots of things on a flea market. And walkers came across this!
I was able to acquire it later.
It's really a chance to be able to find this!
Attached Images
        
Lansquenet59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd January 2020, 01:00 PM   #3
Victrix
Member
 
Victrix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Sweden
Posts: 360
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lansquenet59
Hello, I have a piece of the same kind! Mine comes from a castle in Belgium whose name I forgot. The gardener of the castle who was to clear the contents of a cellar, sold lots of things on a flea market. And walkers came across this!
I was able to acquire it later.
It's really a chance to be able to find this!


An amazing find! Congratulations.
Victrix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd January 2020, 04:11 PM   #4
fernando
Lead Moderator European Armoury
 
fernando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal
Posts: 7,779
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lansquenet59
... Hello, I have a piece of the same kind! ...

Yet yours is a different animal, Thomas. While Ed's examle belongs in the cannon family, yours is the barrel of a haquebut ... right ?
fernando is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd January 2020, 04:50 PM   #5
Lansquenet59
Member
 
Lansquenet59's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: France
Posts: 50
Default

Yes, "hacquebute croc" in french.
Late 15th century, early 16th. There were also bronze models. A model is visible in a museum near my home (St-Omer), it was found in old ditches of the ramparts of the city of Ardres (northern France). Note, the ignition is on the side, so as not to interfere with the vision of the shot.
Lansquenet59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd January 2020, 05:54 PM   #6
fernando
Lead Moderator European Armoury
 
fernando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal
Posts: 7,779
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lansquenet59
... Note, the ignition is on the side, so as not to interfere with the vision of the shot...

A new step in these guns evolution, in their path to later shoulder guns !
fernando is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd January 2020, 06:41 PM   #7
M ELEY
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: NC, U.S.A.
Posts: 1,650
Default

Both of these are amazing pieces! Don't remember seeing Ed's thread from earlier. His appears to be a mounted 'wall gun', the precursor to the later swivel guns used both on ship's rails and fortress walls.

Thomas's piece is, as noted, a haquebut. Shocking to see how big the barrel is! It literally was a hand cannon...
M ELEY is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 06:49 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.