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Old 25th August 2018, 08:29 AM   #1
Kmaddock
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Default Very generic knife for ID please

Hi all
Just got the attached knife
It is missing the pommel and the blade is not in the best shape, but it probably could be cleaned up ok
Would anyone have any idea as to where it may be from
The handle looks to be of a v black wood, ebony?
Blade is fullered and is 13 inch long with some of the tip missing, length of the handle is 6 inches
Cross guard is made of steel.

If anyone would have opinion on age and or origin I would appreciate the information.

Regards

Ken
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Old 25th August 2018, 01:17 PM   #2
Hotspur
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A Napoleonic (or just a tad earlier), probably naval dirk. The dark grip generally regarded for a junior officer. The pommel likely what is regarded a "pillow" pommel. Possibly German manufacture but often British use. I'd like to see the blade decoration, point of the blade ^^^^^^up.

Cheers
GC

Edit to add a sold example with a diamond cross section blade.
http://steverogersantiques.com/cgi-...item_id=170214a
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Old 25th August 2018, 06:30 PM   #3
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Hi GC.
looks as if you are spot on with your ID.
I have not gone cleaning the knife yet but I do not think that there is any decoration on the blade.
Pommel looks like it would be possible to replicate a new one so there could be a project in the offing
Thanks for the link and images and when I give the blade a soak in diesel I will see if there is any blade marking and report back.
Cheers

Ken
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Old 26th August 2018, 02:15 AM   #4
M ELEY
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Glenn indeed nailed it correctly.

British naval dirks (and American, come to think of it) fell into two different categories: dress dirks and fighting examples. All of them determined rank, but I am particularly drawn to the 'fighting' pieces such as yours (dress pieces were definitely more beautifully/artistically decorated, but with minuscule blades sometimes with no edge and purely for decor).

Mark
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