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Old 21st January 2018, 01:57 PM   #1
fernando
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Default Some 'aggressive' tool for ID

I have this compulsive habit in that, when visiting local flea markets (and not only) i find nothing that fits my hobby, i open an exception for alliens to fit in. I don't even know where i am going to store this one.
I bet some of you guys have already seen this or similar things out there, while for me this is the first time i saw one.
Certainly not a scythe; its working approach is completey different. It has no angle or length to function at ground level and its design calls for a different movement; instead of swinging it suggests a push & pull (saw) action, to operate at a standing up level.
Wuih 100 cms total length, a thickness of over 6 mm. and a 1600 grams weight, it has a flat cross section, with a sharp edge along its teeth and a back edge in its last 20 mm, forming a sword like point. So it doesn't only 'saw', but also 'perforates'.
It should have some age, with worm holes in both handles; i would die in despair if otherwise
The seller said he brings all his stuff from Switzerland, but it doesn't mean this device is Swiss ... most certainly not; its paraphernalia included a Columbia horse saddle.
Anyone care to enlighten me on this one ... please ?


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Old 21st January 2018, 02:19 PM   #2
Rick
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Old 21st January 2018, 05:28 PM   #3
A. G. Maisey
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Yep.
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Old 22nd January 2018, 02:38 AM   #4
Pukka Bundook
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Yes, hayknife. V good steel in them usually!
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Old 22nd January 2018, 12:56 PM   #5
fernando
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Thank you so much, Gentlemen.
Rick, you took 22 minutes to empty my dream in that this device had a more thrilling purpose ... serrated edge, spear point and all .
So' hay knife' were the key words; i went browsing with them and found tons of information on these things ... as if they were not an American invention, despite some misinformed sources pretending that they have a British origin.
I take it that this specific specimen also came from America. So far and after an exhaustive search i didn't even know how to translate their name to my lingo, let alone their apparent no use in my neck of the woods.
However among the various variants published out there this very (hopefuly old) one has a particular difference ... or two: The front grip stem does not result from a bifurcation split from the blade main arm but is cut in sharp angles. Also and more atypical is that such front grip arm bends towards the opposite direction from all the ones i have seen so far; could it be that this is a left hander option ?.
Don't you guys pay much attention, i am just letting go my disillusion steam.


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Old 22nd January 2018, 01:13 PM   #6
Pukka Bundook
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Fernando,

In England we used a "Hay Spade" rather than a hay -knife.
A hay -spade had a more or less spade shaped working end, (the shape of a spade in cards (ace of Spades)) with a shaft off-set so one didn't cut off ones feet in use. It had a long "t" shaped handle on the top.
I used one quite a lot back home, but not for cutting hay-stacks!
Cutting packed manure in calf sheds, to cutting through the thick beds of reed roots growing in water courses, then dragging them to shore with a cromb, or bent -tined fork. all fun and tiring!
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Old 22nd January 2018, 09:54 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fernando
Thank you so much, Gentlemen.
Rick, you took 22 minutes to empty my dream in that this device had a more thrilling purpose ... serrated edge, spear point and all .
So' hay knife' were the key words; i went browsing with them and found tons of information on these things ... as if they were not an American invention, despite some misinformed sources pretending that they have a British origin.


Yankee Ingenuity Fernando.
I grew up on a farm that dated back to 1690.
There were lots of strange implements.
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