Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > Ethnographic Weapons

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 9th June 2023, 12:12 PM   #1
Yvain
Member
 
Yvain's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: France
Posts: 147
Default Takouba with old european blade

Hi all!



Today I received this takouba that I won at an auction some weeks ago! As you can imagine, I'm very pleased with it. The mounts are in an older style (late 19th century perhaps), but the most interesting part is the blade.



It seems to be an older european blade that was locally "sandwiched". On both face, the blade bears a wolf of Passau, and the inscription "SAHAGVM". Alfonso de Sahagún was a Spanish smith from the second part of the 16th century, but his signature was copied a lot, including on some Passau blades. The general shape of the blade, fuller, and marks makes me think that it could be from the second part of the 16th century, or perhaps early 17th century.



Some similar blades : https://www.antique-swords.com/AA96-...-Mortuary.html


https://www.olympiaauctions.com/sale.../view-lot/118/


https://collection.maas.museum/object/249330


Anyway, I’m really happy about it! (And sorry for the not so good pictures, I'm preparing for moving out and don't have much space)
Attached Images
     
Yvain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th June 2023, 01:12 PM   #2
Lee
EAAF Staff
 
Lee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Upstate New York, USA
Posts: 861
Thumbs up Very nice old warrior!

Very nice! If you slap the flat of the blade against your thigh and find it 'springy' (that is, it vibrates for a moment) that would argue for it being the old European blade it certainly appears to be, rather than an antique local copy that would very quickly dampen out the vibration.

Look for: Briggs, Lloyd Cabot, "European Blades in Tuareg Swords and Daggers," The Journal of the Arms & Armour Society [U.K.] Vol. V. No. 2. (1965), p. 37 - 92.
Lee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th June 2023, 03:21 PM   #3
Yvain
Member
 
Yvain's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: France
Posts: 147
Default

The sandwiched ricasso dampens the vibrations a bit but the blade is springy and behaves correctly for a European piece. (I also don't think I ever saw a locally made takouba blade with this shape, but it could have happened indeed). I have the article you mention, I will have to search for it on my computer!
Yvain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th June 2023, 04:28 PM   #4
TVV
Member
 
TVV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Bay Area
Posts: 1,527
Default

Congratulations, looks like an old European blade indeed. The sandwich construction was used for older blades that had been remounted multiple times causing wear to the tang.
TVV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th June 2023, 12:15 AM   #5
Yvain
Member
 
Yvain's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: France
Posts: 147
Default

Indeed TVV, I have another one like this. Though in this case I think the main goal could have been to lengthen the blade, as the "sandwich" part doesn't hide the beginning of the blade
Yvain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th June 2023, 03:23 PM   #6
Jim McDougall
Arms Historian
 
Jim McDougall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Route 66
Posts: 9,373
Default

I agree with the consensus here, this appears to be a European blade and has suffered the torments consistent with the Sahara, with these blades that came into this sphere through the 19th century through Mediterranean trade. These circulated for many generations and went through many alterations in their repeated remounting.

The 'Passau' wolf seems well executed and consistent with the standard configurations typically used in Solingen work. The SAHAGUM was one of the many also consistent names etc. used spuriously in Solingen implying the work of makers in Toledo.It seems blades using this name were typically destined for North Europe, but obviously these like others often ended up in varying circumstances.

The 'sandwiched' metal applied at the forte is a strengthening application commonly used in the Sahara for blades often remounted as Teodor notes, if I recall termed 'adabal'. The rebated point of the blade is also to tribal preference and in accord with the slashing cuts used by Tuareg tribesmen.

The blade has fared well relatively with the markings as these were typically scoured often in sharpening using stones and such rugged methods. The new reddish rust may be from moisture arising in its location for a time especially if scabbarded. Its always hard to tell from photos but the metal seems otherwise unusually bright.
Jim McDougall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th June 2023, 03:39 PM   #7
Marc M.
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Belgium
Posts: 62
Default

Hi Yvain

Nice takuba and a good european blade. Best to remove the active rust.

Regards
Marc
Marc M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:53 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.