Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > European Armoury
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 28th September 2010, 05:45 PM   #1
Dmitry
Member
 
Dmitry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 536
Default European arquebus, 1600s.

Some fodder for the matchlock crowd.
To my untrained eye this looks like a ca.1650 wall gun.
According to the description the barrel is 140 cm. long. The lock plate appears to have a mark MK struck on it.
What are your thoughts?
Attached Images
 
Dmitry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2010, 06:39 PM   #2
Matchlock
(deceased)
 
Matchlock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Bavaria, Germany - the center of 15th and 16th century gunmaking
Posts: 4,310
Default

WOW, Dmitry,

Your pics made me blush with envy!

Your guess is correct, it is not an arquebus but a South German, most probably Suhl made, relatively light matchlock wall piece of exactly 1625-30! Please look closely at the lock, left rear end, and the surface of the barrel rear, there Must be Suhl control marks (SVL and a stylized hen).

The maker's mark MK on the lockplate will be easy for me to identify if I can get a good close-up!

All in all, it's a fine Thirty Years War piece. Is it yours?

It is obviously preserved in optimum original and virtually 'untouched' condition - please leave it this way, don't clean it!!! The brownish barrel color is hundreds of years old arsenal conservation olive or crude linseed oil now heavily patinated. All egdes are perfectly crisp, and the stock retains its original surface!
As it is a wall gun there is no provision for a ramrod.
The overall length must be ca. 170 cm.

The lock is a regular sear matchlock but its outer shape reminds of a wheel-lock, in order to convey the impression of a more expensive mechanism.

As far as I can tell the only alterations of probably 18th century re-use are the flintlock like 'steel' replacing the originally flat, swiveling pan cover and two reinforcing iron plates on the outide of the lock plate; the steel like piece seems to replace the now missing original fire screen. The matchcord is modern, and the tip of the buttstock is somewhat reduced in width. I surmise there is probably no iron buttplate.

I attach some photos of similar pieces in the Emden and Graz arsenals.

Again, congrats!!!

Best,
Michael
Attached Images
   

Last edited by Matchlock : 28th September 2010 at 07:06 PM.
Matchlock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2010, 07:03 PM   #3
Dmitry
Member
 
Dmitry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 536
Default

Michael, as always, you're on top of your game!
I haven't seen this one 'en vivo', but will do so this weekend. It's rare to see a European piece like this in our parts [New England], and when one does appear, it is from an old family estate, where it sat for hundreds of years.
For instance, I have just purchased a superb pappenheimer broadsword that was found in an old house in Connecticut, literally days ago.

I'll keep you posted!
Dmitry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2010, 07:09 PM   #4
Matchlock
(deceased)
 
Matchlock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Bavaria, Germany - the center of 15th and 16th century gunmaking
Posts: 4,310
Default

OK, so do take your own good pics on viewing!

m

Last edited by Matchlock : 28th September 2010 at 08:19 PM.
Matchlock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2010, 07:58 PM   #5
Matchlock
(deceased)
 
Matchlock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Bavaria, Germany - the center of 15th and 16th century gunmaking
Posts: 4,310
Default

I can see at least three marks on the rear flats of the barrel! Watch out for them when you are there!

The one in the middle should be the maker's or dealer's mark, the two at the left and the right must be SVL and the hen!!!

m

Last edited by Matchlock : 28th September 2010 at 08:25 PM.
Matchlock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2010, 09:30 PM   #6
Dmitry
Member
 
Dmitry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 536
Default

You know, I may be completely off base here, but looking at the martial weapons of that period, I see a notable disparity between the edged weapons and the firearms. Even the most utilitarian munition grade swords have some kind of decorations, be it the most crude designs or shapes, whereas the firearms are austere.
Dmitry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2010, 10:37 PM   #7
Matchlock
(deceased)
 
Matchlock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Bavaria, Germany - the center of 15th and 16th century gunmaking
Posts: 4,310
Default

Quite right!

m
Matchlock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15th March 2016, 12:59 PM   #8
Nakampfmesser76
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 6
Default good morning to all, i have this

i found this in italy...
Nakampfmesser76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 12:56 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.