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Old 10th August 2022, 02:58 PM   #1
kronckew
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Default Indonesian European style 'Falchion' for discussion

Picked this up at an auction today, more info/pics on arrival.
Appears to be from Tjikoreh (Chikorea, in the modern Indonesian), marking is a bit odd tho. Mis-spelling or alternate spelling "Tjiratiing"? Extensive punched decoration down the fuller.

1902 date. 51 cm. (20 in.) blade. Wood scabbard.


Thanks for your comments...
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Old 10th August 2022, 03:58 PM   #2
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Would this be classified as a Klewang?
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Old 10th August 2022, 04:22 PM   #3
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It is a Tjikeroeh, they come in all sizes …
from dagger, golok, to klewang.
And a variety of spelling as well
See also:

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showth...ight=Tjikeroeh

http://vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=5260
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Old 10th August 2022, 06:16 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Interested Party View Post
Would this be classified as a Klewang?

I'd class it as a klewang, these were made mostly for the dutch colonials/soldiers in the form of the 'familiar' (to them) hirshfanger/Hunting Sword/dagger, rather than the more local forms of klewang.


I called it a falchion as this one is more of a chopper than a stabber like most european hunting swords. I have a couple of them of more normal pointyness , including the ubiquitous Dutch Klewang/Cutlass used by the dutch/germans/americans. (as below) and by the japanese, after shortening the blade, and modifying the guard on a batch they captured.


I'm a sucker for stag antler grips...
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Old 10th August 2022, 08:40 PM   #5
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Very nice sword. The scabbard looks like a Maasai sheath without the leather covering; do you think that it is original to the blade?
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Old 10th August 2022, 09:31 PM   #6
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Default Tjipatjing

Most swords of this kind were made in Tjikeroeh (Cikeruh).
Tjpatjing (Cipacing) is an other village on West-Java where this type of sword was made.
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Old 10th August 2022, 09:39 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drac2k View Post
Very nice sword. The scabbard looks like a Maasai sheath without the leather covering; do you think that it is original to the blade?
these are originals: made for the Dutch military police and also used in Indonesia when it was part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Some were shortened by the Japanese during WW2

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showth...hlight=klewang
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Old 11th August 2022, 03:06 AM   #8
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Sorry if my post wasn't clearer; I was referring to the first picture with the wooden scabbard.
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Old 11th August 2022, 09:40 AM   #9
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From pictures in the linked threads above, the wooden scabbards are fairly typical. there does seem to be a crack in the wood near the throat. Might be why the metal bands are there. I'll wick in some superglue when it arrives, justincase.


Coincidentally, the sword was listed with a decent Maasai seme & its red scabbard, which does look quite similar. It'll come with the klewang. Already have two, they seem to accumulate, like ex-wives...

Convergent evolution
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Old 11th August 2022, 09:47 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Albert View Post
Most swords of this kind were made in Tjikeroeh (Cikeruh).
Tjpatjing (Cipacing) is an other village on West-Java where this type of sword was made.

Cool info. i suspected it might be something like that, but couldn't google up that info. Thanks.
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Old 16th August 2022, 12:54 AM   #11
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Default I Want One

kronckew,

I really like your sword. It looks something like a small da dao. I imagine that it could deal a heck of a blow, even in close quarters.

Sincerely,
RobT
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Old 16th August 2022, 04:12 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gp View Post
these are originals: made for the Dutch military police and also used in Indonesia when it was part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Some were shortened by the Japanese during WW2

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showth...hlight=klewang
I have always been a bit confused why the Dutch chose to call these swords "Klewang". Obviously the word is original to the Indonesian weapons which really are a very different blade form, though i suppose the Dutch versions saw a lot of the same function as a jungle clearing tool/weapon. But these two types of klewang are shaped differently and weighed differently and i would image required somewhat different techniques to properly wield.
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Old 16th August 2022, 07:02 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David View Post
I have always been a bit confused why the Dutch chose to call these swords "Klewang". Obviously the word is original to the Indonesian weapons which really are a very different blade form, though i suppose the Dutch versions saw a lot of the same function as a jungle clearing tool/weapon. But these two types of klewang are shaped differently and weighed differently and i would image required somewhat different techniques to properly wield.
Here is a partial explanation: they took it from Indonesia, moreover Atjeh / Aceh.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klewang

In Dutch it became part of our language as we have an expression
“chase someone over the Klewang” …
Guess the meaning is quite obvious, as it is a quite rude way as well to express a deadly battle encounter / situation.
Became very fast integrated into the Dutch language: I recall my late father using it easily when describing the WWII encounters with the Japanese in the very few occasions he spoke about that time….
So it is very understandable the likes of Hembrug produced these klewangs
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Old 16th August 2022, 10:45 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gp View Post
Here is a partial explanation: they took it from Indonesia, moreover Atjeh / Aceh.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klewang

In Dutch it became part of our language as we have an expression
“chase someone over the Klewang” …
Are you sure you don't mean the kling (blade)? I've heard "over de kling jagen" but never "over de klewang".
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Old 18th August 2022, 05:23 PM   #15
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Quote:
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Are you sure you don't mean the kling (blade)? I've heard "over de kling jagen" but never "over de klewang".
Correct “ over de kling jagen” or even “ over de kling springen” is the correct proverb, must be my father used it in a wide way of speaking to ventilate his feelings of the jungle encounters.
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