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Old 3rd November 2019, 01:30 PM   #1
thomas hauschild
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Default A peuseung to share

That found its way to me. Typical blade. Blade show some laminations but I will keep it as it is with some marks in the blade. The read leather is possibly replaced later. Who knows.

Any comments about the exact name and the possible age will be welcome.

Best Thomas
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Old 3rd November 2019, 03:52 PM   #2
ariel
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This one is a locally-interpreted South Indian sword. In this case it is Khanda with a so-called Gulabkhati handle, an Indian basket hilt with a bent grip and a rose- like pommel ( as per Pant). You can look its name in a wonderful book by Albert van Zonneveldt: it has far to many “ eu’s” for me to know how to pronounce it correctly:-)

Apparently, the Sumatrans were not very impressed with the blade, because they favored tip-heavy ones, to amplify chopping function. These ones were ( apparently) used by the Royal guards. I am not into Indonesian weapons, but this one I would love to have next to its Indian ancestors.

Another locally-interpreted sword from the same area is Piso Podang.
The name. Podang apparently stems from the Portuguese word for a “ sword”, espadao, pronounced espadang. It has a handle characterized by Tulwar-like configuration but with deep cup-like pommel and baluster arising from the very bottom of it. It was observed in India of the 16 and earlier centuries. Jens was kind enough to send me pics from Hamzanamah showing such a handle. The only living example of it belongs to Brian Isaac and was illustrated by Elgood in his book about S. Indian weapons in the chapter about 4 important swords.
Thus, contacts with both Indians and the Portuguese left their imprints on Sumatran weapons.

The “ open cup” handle in India of 16 century is also shown in Hamzanamah ( thanks Jens!) and was preserved in NW part of the country, but with more shallow cup, and went to Afghanistan, where the cup acquired a lid (see pulwar). Jens in his book shows NW Indian or even Afghani saber with brass handle , likely 17 century, with such open cup and I have a similar one, much simpler, but with a deeper cup, also likely 17 century.

The travel of weapons is a fascinating story. One can trace peregrinations of decorative details, especially the handles , and superimpose historical evidence on physical objects.
This is a lot of fun!
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Old 3rd November 2019, 05:20 PM   #3
kai
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Cool

Wow, you've been quite busy, Thomas!

This is an Atjeh peudeueng with oelee meu apet (or in modern rendering pedang with hulu meu apet from, most likely, Aceh). If you follow Albert's classification, it the classical type 1.

The leather pad looks good to me from the pics. As with any part subject to wear it may be a replacement as expected, possibly during its working life.

Enjoy this piece!

Regards,
Kai
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Old 3rd November 2019, 05:40 PM   #4
kai
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Hello Ariel,

Quote:
Apparently, the Sumatrans were not very impressed with the blade, because they favored tip-heavy ones, to amplify chopping function. These ones were ( apparently) used by the Royal guards.

These peudeueng are not tip-heavy even when combined with typical Sumatran hilts. The metal basket hilts actually make these blades even more alive...

While these are generally described as status pieces of the nobility in the old colonial literature, there are also period pics which show more common people wearing these (soldiers, maybe retainers of lesser nobility).

Regards,
Kai
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