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Old 8th August 2016, 01:14 PM   #1
mahratt
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Default Persian Flint

How would you have dated it Persian Flint.
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Old 8th August 2016, 07:59 PM   #2
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Oh..........a Persian flint striker!

No that makes sense. I might put this at the late 1700s by the style.

I hope others chime in.

Very nice example.
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Old 8th August 2016, 09:43 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Battara
Oh..........a Persian flint striker!

No that makes sense. I might put this at the late 1700s by the style.

I hope others chime in.

Very nice example.


Thank you!
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Old 10th August 2016, 11:30 AM   #4
Gavin Nugent
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Based on figure 39 in "Persian Steel", the Tanavoli Collection, circa 1800.

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Old 14th August 2016, 12:12 AM   #5
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Would this have been plain steel or crucible, Gav?
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Old 20th August 2016, 05:20 PM   #6
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What a beautiful flint striker !!! Congrats on finding this. If it has a twin brother, please let me know.
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Old 21st August 2016, 04:57 PM   #7
Oliver Pinchot
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This striker was handwrought (the layering in evident) and then hardened. 1750-1800 is a reasonable time span.
Interestingly, in the 20th century, molds of these strikers were made and cast
in steel by small Persian foundries. They were sold throughout Central and East Asia to nomadic groups. They are identifiable by their relatively coarse detail and finish and, of course, show no signs of forging.
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Old 7th January 2020, 10:47 AM   #8
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That is a fantastic fire steel, as I call them.
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