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Old 12th August 2018, 11:44 PM   #1
snaplock
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Default breechloading systems

Hi, I guess I should introduce myself since I'm a new member. I am a 23 year old gunsmith, knifesmith, and blacksmith. I live in the mountains of north Idaho. I mainly build knives for a living at the moment, mainly patterned after the knives made and used in frontier America during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. I use as close to period correct tools and methods as possible in my work whether for knives or guns. I have a big interest in building and using authentic blackpowder guns especially early and primitive flintlocks. I also am especially interested in flintlock, matchlock, etc. breechloaders. I have got a ton of info from these threads.

I was hoping to find info and pictures of early breechloading guns. I have looked through the "breech loading 1450-1550" thread here and it has a lot of info. However I was hoping I could get more info on the breechloading haquebut posted by Spiridonov on page 2 and guns with similar breechloading systems. At first glance I thought it was one of the guns that used either a pin or wedge through the barrel and chamber to hold a preloaded chamber in the breech. However it looks to me like the slot through the barrel is much to large. Now I'm wondering if it had more or less a sliding breech block like a sideways Sharps falling block.

If you guys have any more info and or pictures of these and any other matchlock through flintlock breechloading systems that would be great.

Thanks so much!
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Old 13th August 2018, 07:09 AM   #2
corrado26
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I do not know if you know the Austrian Crespi-system, here are the fotos
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Old 13th August 2018, 04:48 PM   #3
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Thanks so much!! I have seen the Crespi before and am definitely interested in it, but never found any really good pictures like those. Do you know how the barrel was fastened to the action? Thanks a lot!
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Old 13th August 2018, 06:10 PM   #4
fernando
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Hello snaplock,
As you should have noticed in the introduction of this forum scope, we are dedicated to collectors of actual original antique weapons; modern reproductions not included.
However regarding your interest in firearms ignition systems to build your replicas, you may always use the forum Search button features, using the respective key words, where you will certainly find plenty material.
All the best.
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Old 13th August 2018, 07:07 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snaplock
I was hoping I could get more info on the breechloading haquebut posted by Spiridonov on page 2 and guns with similar breechloading systems.

Hello! What haquebut do You mean?
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Old 13th August 2018, 08:24 PM   #6
snaplock
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Fernando,
I apologize if my questions are outside of how you guys want this forum used. I should have mentioned that I also LOVE collecting antique, especially very primitive matchlock and flintlock guns like the Vietnamese Montagnard muskets. However I do not have the money to buy some of these more rare weapons like the early breechloaders, for that matter I have never had the opportunity even if I had the money. So I was hoping to talk about them, learn, and gather information so that when I have the time I could build one and learn what these designs were really capable of. Besides that I'm not sure I would be too keen on testing an antique with full loads, I would never want to hurt an original let alone myself. I have shot antiques but only with proper loads that could not hurt them. I completely understand you do not want these threads diverted from the purpose of studying antique weapons. I have devoted years to learning all I can about these weapons, and how they were built and used. Even making and testing historic blackpowder recipes to try to find out the original performance of these weapons. If anything I hope to add to the knowledge of them by learning how they were made then and what they were capable of with the powder then available. If you would prefer I will leave out any mention of building them myself in the future. I hope it will be ok if I ask questions concerning the construction of certain parts when that is not obvious.


Spiridonov,
I was referring to the one in the pictures in your posts on page 2 of the thread "Breech loading 1450-1550", posts #42 and #43 of that thread. I may have the term wrong but I think that is a haquebut. If you have any info on how it worked I would appreciate it.



Again I apologize if I have gotten off to a bad start with you guys. I will try to keep anything to do with my projects out of my posts.

Thanks a lot
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Old 13th August 2018, 08:36 PM   #7
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Fair enough .
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Old 13th August 2018, 08:42 PM   #8
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Thanks a lot!
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Old 14th August 2018, 01:54 PM   #9
Pukka Bundook
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Snaplock,

It appears we share similar interests.

Look up the guns of Henry V111, as he had some breechloaders, originally wheel-locks but at least one now fitted with a match lock.

If I remember right, one of these took a cartridge, and was somewhat like a left-handed "Snider" action. Good photos should be available.

All the best,
Richard.
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Old 14th August 2018, 03:09 PM   #10
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Thanks for the advice about looking up the guns of king Henry. I have seen the snider style one but I'll look into it more I didn't know he had others.

I will probably not be able to check this thread until Sunday or monday since I'm going to be busy on a trip with friends. So I very much appreciate all of the help and will definitely reply as soon as I get back.

Thanks!
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