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Old 28th July 2018, 09:08 AM   #1
corrado26
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Default Saxon wheellockpistol 1564

I got this very early wheellock pistol made in 1564 some days ago. It is with a total length of 635mm very long and shows the coat of arms of the archdutchy of Saxony on the buttplate. On the barrel there is an unknown maker's mark and I ask if there is anybody out there who is able to identify this mark.
Thanks a lot
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Old 28th July 2018, 10:18 AM   #2
fernando
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I wouldn't know the mark, but i know this is a very nice pistol ... which i wish i had .
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Old 28th July 2018, 01:07 PM   #3
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Hi Corado

My first thoughts concur with Fernando's comments LOL

What a beautiful, early Saxon pistol. Some observations:

STOCK: The grain look decoration almost makes it appear as if the stock was covered in leather. And just the right amount of ivory/bone decoration, not over-done. Very neat effect.
TRIGGER GUARD: A very simple design that seems common to the period. Notice the loop extends well beyond the trigger itself. It was likely designed this way for the use of leather gloves.
BARREL: Where the wedding band transition from octagon to round location, the fine chisel effect you only see on the better made guns.

The pistol appears to have seen normal usage, but kept in good condition. It's certainly a wonderful addition to your collection. Congratulations.

Rick
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Old 28th July 2018, 02:10 PM   #4
corrado26
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The pistol differs from later examples as a sign of early make in two details: The spring of the cock is still not fixed by a screw to the lockplate but by a cotter at the inside of the plate. The trigger mechanism with a long lever turning around a screw and moved by the trigger is totaly different to later examples.
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Old 28th July 2018, 03:23 PM   #5
Fernando K
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Hi.

Only for a concern. It seems to me that the trigger bar has been replaced. because the backward pressure on its end does not mean horizontal movement, to remove the end of the wheel. In addition, the lock has firing insurance, as in some copies of the wheel, and it is not seen how it works. It would be necessary to have the pieces of the lock disassembled, to see how they interact.

Sorry for the translator

Affectionately
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Old 28th July 2018, 03:43 PM   #6
Marcus den toom
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Hi Colorado,

A very fine wheel lock puffer pistol. The date makes it from the Leibgart of Augustus I.
The auction of Hermann Historica has sold a similar gun at there 2011 auction ( 24.11.2011) lot number 23.
I can not for now find the marking in my books but it looks like a spade?
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Old 29th July 2018, 07:16 AM   #7
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@ FernandoK

here are the fotos of the real Thing - i wanted to avoid dismantling so I took fotos of another piece first, sorry.

As you can see there is an angle between the bar and its end so the trigger is easily able to move the bar backwards.

@ Marcus den toom: the pistol by Hermanns auction 2011 is indeed the same type but not my pistol - there are many differences at the lock.
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Old 29th July 2018, 01:38 PM   #8
Fernando K
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Corrado

I seem to see that they are two pieces, and what we see is the union. This would indicate that there are two sear, the first sear, which is the long bar, and the second sear, which is between the sheets of the real spring, and whose end is perpendicular (or almost) to the long bar.

It's what I see only with seeing the picture. It would be better to hold the piece in your hands

affectionately
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Old 29th July 2018, 03:27 PM   #9
Fernando K
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Corrado

Anyway, if the firing bar is of one piece, the angle (not 90 degrees) allows a movement to the side, and in this differs from the copy that gave otigen to the post, where the angle is 90 degrees. It remains, also, to know how the firing insurance act: I do not know if the second copy has it

Affectionately
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