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Old 17th November 2012, 11:38 AM   #1
weapons 27
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Default pulouar afghan not common handle

.It measures 92 cm long, 4 mm blade thickness
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Old 17th November 2012, 03:51 PM   #2
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looks like a batak piso podang...aside from the curved quillions...
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Old 17th November 2012, 04:01 PM   #3
Jim McDougall
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An outstanding example with what appears to be a most unusual variant pommel!!! Everything else about this paluouar reads distinctly Afghan, especially the quillon terminals, the floral device in the chowk, and in the mounts the fluted scabbard end. It seems these bulbous pommels occur in a number of cases with Islamic swords, so hopefully we can draw some distinction to possible symbolism or occasion.
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Old 17th November 2012, 04:11 PM   #4
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Nice pulwar! there was one similar to it in Kuwait. The ball pommel thingy had something in it that jingles.
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Old 17th November 2012, 04:23 PM   #5
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Very nice pulouar You have. As Ward wrote in a previous thread : Those are seeds that rattle around and my understanding is originally all had them in the basket.
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Old 17th November 2012, 04:57 PM   #6
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I think the blade can be wootz, show us some close ups if possible.
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Old 17th November 2012, 05:39 PM   #7
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the blade is not in woots, I made the photo as soon as possible
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Old 18th November 2012, 02:52 PM   #8
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McDougall
An outstanding example with what appears to be a most unusual variant pommel!!! Everything else about this paluouar reads distinctly Afghan, especially the quillon terminals, the floral device in the chowk, and in the mounts the fluted scabbard end. It seems these bulbous pommels occur in a number of cases with Islamic swords, so hopefully we can draw some distinction to possible symbolism or occasion.



Salaams Jim ~ Indeed it is an interesting pommel ~ Looking at the sword in the Wallace I was inspired to comment on the style; Please see # 14 at http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...LACE+COLLECTION

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Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 18th November 2012, 03:14 PM   #9
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A very nice complete example of good form, thanks for sharing.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McDougall
An outstanding example with what appears to be a most unusual variant pommel!!! Everything else about this paluouar reads distinctly Afghan, especially the quillon terminals, the floral device in the chowk, and in the mounts the fluted scabbard end. It seems these bulbous pommels occur in a number of cases with Islamic swords, so hopefully we can draw some distinction to possible symbolism or occasion.


Here is another within that has the ball pommel but without the flutes.

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...ht=tulwar+hilts

Having had one, they offer a very nice feel in the hand with sword play.

Gav
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Old 18th November 2012, 03:59 PM   #10
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Interesting item, the balde to me looks Indian. It just does not have the curveture of a proper Afghan sword. I have seen handles similar to that before. The rest looks afghan, just the balde seems odd, and not local.
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Old 18th November 2012, 07:39 PM   #11
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Ibrahiim and Gav, thank you guys! Great catches on these comparisons, and both extremely relevant. I think these reflect the potential for associations with the regions most closely connected to the ports and Red Sea trade out of those now Pakistan. The elements of North Indian tulwars, blade and the rather unusual instance of globular pommel, as well as distinct Afghan features amalgamated together present a fasinating anomaly....at least until we find others like it

The globular pommel enclosing seeds or small stones as rattles is an apparant feature of certain Yemeni mounted swords known in Sudan and Darfur in particular late 19th c. used by mounted warriors in threatening foe, as described regarding some broadswords of kaskara type. Possibly this affectation diffused from those regions to trade entrepots connecting through Sind to Afghan routes.
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Old 19th November 2012, 04:19 PM   #12
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McDougall
Ibrahiim and Gav, thank you guys! Great catches on these comparisons, and both extremely relevant. I think these reflect the potential for associations with the regions most closely connected to the ports and Red Sea trade out of those now Pakistan. The elements of North Indian tulwars, blade and the rather unusual instance of globular pommel, as well as distinct Afghan features amalgamated together present a fasinating anomaly....at least until we find others like it

The globular pommel enclosing seeds or small stones as rattles is an apparant feature of certain Yemeni mounted swords known in Sudan and Darfur in particular late 19th c. used by mounted warriors in threatening foe, as described regarding some broadswords of kaskara type. Possibly this affectation diffused from those regions to trade entrepots connecting through Sind to Afghan routes.



Salaams Jim ~ Distinct links to the Mosque style dome design which I think also affects helmet style as well as swords are apparent in architecture in the region ... Interesting to learn that stones beads were inserted in the hollow pommels much in the same way that pebbles were put in the hollow lids of coffee pots in Arabia..to deter people poisoning the coffee... In the case of swords perhaps to deter tampering with weaponry or as you point out to add some noise to the fight...I wonder does the Wallace example rattle? In that example it was said to have originated in Cairo and looking at the fine examples of domes there it could be true, though, it is peculiar since it was a weapon worn by a Persian nobleman and I cant help wondering why he would opt for a Cairo hilt when such fine examples were available in Persia...? It is however probably a subject for another discussion but I mention it on passing.
Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 20th November 2012, 12:22 AM   #13
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Outstanding Ibrahiim, once again, the architectural influence in the various hilt elements of swords. These pommels and that on the early Omani sa'if, both reflecting Mosque domes and minarets. In tulwars and other Indian swords such architectural features are known, and for tulwar pommels often resemble various stupa forms.

All the best,
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