Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > Ethnographic Weapons

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 20th November 2022, 09:24 PM   #1
BBking
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 53
Default ceylanese small ( presentation ?)sword

Hello everybody,

I wanted to show you this small sword-dagger I have.
Not really a weapon, more a small presentation sword 22 inches long
with a ''fake'' flexible blade ( anchor engraved on it ).

I have it from a long time,
I like the fine silver work and all the small semi-precious stones inserts
( maybe someone knows what kind of stone the big red-orange one is ?
It seems carnelian but it isn't )

But I never liked the fake flexible blade ( silvered copper or silver )
and was looking for change it for a real old ceylanese blade with similar dimensions ...

Butt today I saw ''the same'' small sword sold in an auction,
more stones but same work and ''fake'' blade
XXL starting price ! many thousand euros...
( seems reaaally exaggerated !)

I change my mind...maybe I will leave it like that !
Attached Images
     
BBking is offline  
Old 21st November 2022, 11:43 AM   #2
Tim Simmons
Member
 
Tim Simmons's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: What is still UK
Posts: 5,596
Default

A lot of work gone into it.
Tim Simmons is offline  
Old 21st November 2022, 01:54 PM   #3
mariusgmioc
Member
 
mariusgmioc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Austria
Posts: 1,817
Default

This is a "Kastane" sword, most likely from early 20th century. They serve ceremonial purposes, like traditional weddings and celebrations.
Yours is a very beautiful example! 🤩🤩🤩 The red stones are most likely low grade carbochon rubies, and the bigger orange one can be agate.
Lovely example! 👍
mariusgmioc is offline  
Old 21st November 2022, 04:48 PM   #4
ariel
Member
 
ariel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 5,485
Default

Fully agree with Tim and Marius' opinions.
Sometimes we all go outside of our "historical, fighting, bloody" frame of mind and get attracted by the artistic quality. This one gets very high marks in that department.
ariel is offline  
Old 21st November 2022, 05:53 PM   #5
BBking
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 53
Default

Thank you dear members for your comments !

Here for share two other pictures of the disassembled parts of the small sword
( was slightly moving...)
and the interesting hilt and wooden scabbard structure

Kind regards
Attached Images
  
BBking is offline  
Old 21st November 2022, 07:36 PM   #6
Jim McDougall
Arms Historian
 
Jim McDougall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Route 66
Posts: 9,163
Default

As well observed by everyone here already, this is most clearly a dress item which is of course likely for a naval officer as shown by the fouled anchor on the blade. These kinds of items were sometimes diplomatically oriented as the trade and other relations with Dutch and British were notable in Ceylon and these regions through the 19th century (of course these historically were from earlier centuries) and into 20th.

As Ariel has well noted, while we focus typically on the obviously combative qualities of weapons, often these kinds of pieces are fascinating for their artistic merits. The artisans of Sri Lanka (Ceylon) were always celebrated for the beautiful weaponry they produced that were important accoutrements for the royal figures and officials there.
The kastane itself, the sword this is based on, was a court or official dress sword rather than a combat weapon, though it was typically mounted with Dutch or British hanger blades.
Jim McDougall is offline  
Old 21st November 2022, 07:39 PM   #7
Peter Hudson
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 115
Default

On forum there are a few good threads worth consideration Please see Sinhala / Sri Lankan Swords? or tap it into search

Peter Hudson.
Peter Hudson is offline  
Old 21st November 2022, 07:59 PM   #8
kai
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,954
Wink

Just to state the obvious: This is a really late (maybe even post-colonial) example and, despite the effort put into the silverwork, the craftsmanship does not compare well to the old style pieces.

Regards,
Kai
kai is offline  
Old 21st November 2022, 08:32 PM   #9
David
Keris forum moderator
 
David's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 6,725
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mariusgmioc View Post
The red stones are most likely low grade carbochon rubies, and the bigger orange one can be agate.
Lovely example! 👍
My first impression is the the "red" stones are more likely amethyst.
David is offline  
Old 21st November 2022, 09:42 PM   #10
ariel
Member
 
ariel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 5,485
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by David View Post
My first impression is the the "red" stones are more likely amethyst.
Most likely, but still not glass or quartz. Call it semi-precious?
ariel is offline  
Old 21st November 2022, 10:32 PM   #11
BBking
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 53
Default

I always found these swords described as rare (why ?) early 20th century models and set with semi-precious stones,

sometimes the word rubies is written in the description but it's exactly the same violet color ...


Sure larger kastane swords from the 19th are real weapons and I like them,

so was I surprised when I saw that these later 20th ''presentation'' models
with same semi-precious stones, not diamonds
were sold twice ( or more ) the price of large good 19th silver mounted kastane swords
BBking is offline  
Old 21st November 2022, 10:51 PM   #12
BBking
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 53
Default

This one per example described to be set with garnets,
usually red stones...

sold for a really high price after a ''fair correct'' estimation.

really look like,
ok , there are more violet stones and gilted silver parts...
Attached Images
  
BBking is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:05 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.