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Old 29th December 2017, 06:37 PM   #1
AHorsa
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Default Walloon sword 17th century

Dear All,

just acquired this classical walloon sword today. The blade shows the passauer wolf as well as the inscription "S A H A G O M".
The iron condition is amazingly good for its 350 years, only few pittings.

I plan to fix the grip wires but I am not sure if I should remove the rust, which is just loose surface rust and would be easy and gently to remove using e.g. steel wool.
What is your opinion on this? Leave it as found or clean it?

Best regards
Andreas
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Old 30th December 2017, 05:12 PM   #2
CSinTX
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Very nice!

I vote clean it. That blade is going to look really good cleaned up a little.
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Old 30th December 2017, 10:43 PM   #3
AHorsa
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thanks for your reply. I also think I will clean it. Will post pictures of the outcome.

one general question on those Walloon swords:
some descriptions say it is the French model 1678/79, some say they are Dutch and around 1650, some has a xxx-mark on the ricasso, which some people interpret as an arsenal stamp for the Amsterdam town guard but I also read that those stamps are just trader stamps.
Can someone bring light into the darkness and explain where those swords can be located and how they can be dated?

Kind regards
Andreas
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Old 31st December 2017, 03:34 AM   #4
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Yes, definitely give it some light cleaning, just nothing major.

The wire can be repaired, not such a big deal, I just would not replace it, as much as possible.

Nice piece!
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Old 31st December 2017, 10:47 AM   #5
canos
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Don't clean with steel wool to remove rust. Better take NEVER DULL, Brunox or Ballistol. Allow to work for some time. Wipe off. Better results with Brunox.
Kind regards
Canos


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Last edited by fernando : 1st January 2018 at 10:08 AM. Reason: Poster re-submitted translation
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Old 1st January 2018, 10:52 AM   #6
canos
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Default General about Wallone sword

Quote:
Originally Posted by AHorsa
thanks for your reply. I also think I will clean it. Will post pictures of the outcome.

one general question on those Walloon swords:
some descriptions say it is the French model 1678/79, some say they are Dutch and around 1650, some has a xxx-mark on the ricasso, which some people interpret as an arsenal stamp for the Amsterdam town guard but I also read that those stamps are just trader stamps.
Can someone bring light into the darkness and explain where those swords can be located and how they can be dated?

Kind regards
Andreas



Hello Andreas,
the Wallonne was used during the Thirty Years' War (1618-1648) generally in Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland and Scandinavia. After their campaign against the Netherlands in 1672 the French took over the model of the Wallonne for the French army. He served at the time of Louis XIII. and Louis XIV of the French army as a rider weapon ( Dragoons,. the Cavalerie Legère ). The Wallone was the precursor of a regulated weapon for the French army. The Minister of War under Louis XIVh had a substantial share in it: Francois Michel LE TELLIER, MARQUIS DE LOUVOIS. His work is closely linked to the historical development of the French army. A strict regulation did not exist yet. The manufacturing took over various weapons makers who can explain the deviations in the sword. Around 1679, the Wallonne was officially incorporated into the French army in France, but initially without strict rules. From today's Wallonne were numerous weapons, otherwise procured Wallonne of private manufacturers in the army available.

The blades of these swords have a variety of inscriptions:
- "M.E.F.E.C.I.T and + S + A + H + A + G + V + N" - Alonso de SAHAGUM (the older / younger one) a manufacturer in Toledo. His trademark: "S" under stylized crown, in a carded coat of arms. The blades marked "SAHAGUN" are not from Toledo! The license plate is missing.
- "MEFECIT - MH": MH = unknown manufacturer or "MEFECIT - CB" = Clemens
Botter or Potter.
- "S + A + H + A + G + O + N" = cf. about.
- "ME FECIT SALINGEN" = I was made in Solingen.

All inscriptions come with the Passauer Wolfzeichen , here a "modified, smooth" form, as well as the inscription SAHAGON - they served as a quality feature or sales aid.

Kind regards
Canos
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