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Old 15th June 2010, 10:05 PM   #1
Iliad
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Default Makila

Hi guys,
I searched the database but could not find any photos or information about the Basque Makila (Makhila). I have one, so thought that I would put up some photos, so that they would be in the database for research purposes.
The man I bought it from said that his father took it off an Italian prisoner of war in WW 2.
Regards to all, Brian
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Old 15th June 2010, 10:08 PM   #2
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Oops, I posted this under Ethnographic instead of European........can a moderator shift it please? My apologies
Brian
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Old 16th June 2010, 12:13 AM   #3
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Hi Brian,
IMHO as these are traditional for the Basque people, I would say that the Ethnographic forum is the right place for the post.

Regards David
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Old 16th June 2010, 12:23 PM   #4
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Funny how "Ethnographic" is applied always to "the other"'s culture . For me, a Bowie Knife is an ethnographic weapon
But we discussed this before, here...
Anyway, you can find some information on Makila over the net, but it's almost invariably in Spanish. That, if you're lucky and it's not in Euskera (Basque).
This is a good place, for example.
The inscriptions in the upper and lower ferrules are usually traditional sentences in Basque. For what little I can read from the upper one (in the ferrule under the head) it probably says "Nere laguna eta laguntza", which would (freely, very freely) translate as "My companion/partner and help"

You have a nice one, there, by the way.

Best,

Marc
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Old 16th June 2010, 04:09 PM   #5
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Hi David,

Basques aren't European?

It's good to see a makila, especially the spike head.

Best,

F
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Old 16th June 2010, 05:18 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fearn
Hi David,

Basques aren't European?

Best,

F


Hi Fearn,
did I say Basques were not European . The Basques are described thus....

"....As with their language, the Basques are clearly a distinct ethnic group in their region. They notably regard themselves as culturally and especially linguistically distinct from their surrounding neighbours...."

....and seeing that a brief definition of Ethnography is..

"......Ethnography (Greek ἔθνος ethnos = folk/people and γράφειν graphein = writing) is a research strategy often used in the social sciences, particularly in anthropology and in some branches of sociology.[1] It is often employed for gathering empirical data on human societies/cultures....."

I cannot see any reason why the post cannot remain on 'Ethnographics' ....or are you suggesting that the modern decendants of the Sioux do not have 'Ethnographic affiliations' ....now they possess US passports........

Kind Regards David
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Old 17th June 2010, 01:45 AM   #7
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Default Makila

Gentlemen, thank you for the responses thus far. The inscription at the bottom is "Ainciart Bergara Larresore", which I assume is the maker's name. The inscription at the top is indeed "Nere Laguna Eta Laguntza".
Best, Brian
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Old 17th June 2010, 02:26 PM   #8
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Ah, indeed. Larressore is a town in the French Basque Country, and Ainciart-Bergara is the name of a family of Makila-Makers from there. The original name was Ainciart, recorded since mid-19th c., I think the combined name Aincart-Bergara dates from early 20th c. to nowadays.
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Old 17th June 2010, 03:58 PM   #9
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Does anyone know whether there is a 'formalised' fighting system (martial art ?) that is taught for the use of the Makila.

Regards David
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Old 17th June 2010, 06:43 PM   #10
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I've never heard of one, but I'll bet that the portuguese Jogo do pau would work nicely with it (amazon link). The sticks are similar length, and the portuguese also spiked their walking sticks.

Best,

F
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Old 21st November 2011, 07:22 PM   #11
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Default Makila again

Hi guys,
I have now acquired another Makila, nothing special, but I thought that I would post pics, so that they will be available for researchers in the future.
Can anyone translate the inscription for me?
Brian
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Old 21st November 2011, 11:25 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iliad
Hi guys,
I have now acquired another Makila, nothing special, but I thought that I would post pics, so that they will be available for researchers in the future.
Can anyone translate the inscription for me?
Brian

1894 DUFOUG SAINT JEAN DE LUZ
DUFOURG, it's a Basque family surname, probably, the name of the artisan who manufactured this "makila"
SAINT JEAN DE LUZ, it's "THE" main harbor, in French Basque country



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Old 21st November 2011, 11:54 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katana
Does anyone know whether there is a 'formalised' fighting system (martial art ?) that is taught for the use of the Makila.
Hi
as far as I know, (I resided for job during 3 years in Basque country)
no conventional martial art with a "makila"
makila it's considered as weapon, not only as a walking stick
- in the handle, normally, is a dagger hidden ... inside
- the head, it's a real "war club" ... a "mace"

French law forbid to person, to carry this type of cane, considered as "weapons of category 6th"
ability to purchase it, ability to have it at home,
in case of transport, must be packed inside a luggage, or a transport bag

" Dura lex, sed lex " (The law is hard, but it's the law)

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Old 22nd November 2011, 01:34 AM   #14
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I SAW A MOVIE IN 1959 ABOUT THE BASQUE , THE NAME WAS " THUNDER IN THE SUN ". IT WAS A WESTERN THE BASQUE IMAGRANTS WERE TRYING TO GET TO CALIFORNIA BY WAGON TRAIN AND BRINGING GRAPE VINES TO START VINYARDS MOVIE TIME FRAME CIRC 1847 . I HAVE NO IDEA IF IT WAS AT ALL ACCURATE AS TO BASQUE BELIEFS BUT IT WAS ENTERTAINING. THEIR WAR CRY AND USE OF A HI-LIE HAND PIECE TO THROW ROCKS WHEN FIGHTING INDIANS WAS UNIQUE. THE ONLY OTHER THING I KNOW ABOUT THEM IS THEY ARE ADEPT AT CATCHING PUFFIN BIRDS WITH NETS FOR DINNER.
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