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Old 14th December 2017, 06:58 PM   #31
fernando
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kronckew
...the kitchen and dining room table are my work areas ...

Not the dining room table anymore for me, since i swapped a little pine table for one of these luxury extendible specimens. Only suitable for innocuous bricolage .
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Old 22nd December 2017, 07:21 PM   #32
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I had the great fortune to visit the Imperial armoury at the Hofburg in Vienna. They had a couple of boar hunting swords speciments. Please see below for some amateur photos.
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Old 23rd December 2017, 03:34 PM   #33
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Thank you for the pictures, they do provide some additional insight!
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Old 23rd December 2017, 07:12 PM   #34
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Iím glad you enjoyed the photos Foxbat. Unfortunately the lighting was weak in the museum. In fact I triggered the alarm when I came too close to photograph some halberds makers marks. Iím glad they didnít throw me out

Merry Christmas to all.
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Old 28th December 2017, 02:52 AM   #35
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Default thanks for sharing your pics

Note the inclusion of another pig poker -- the boar SPEAR in one of the images -- it's a famous one, part of a four-piece garniture (also including a marshal's baton and 2 swords) by Milanese armorers Daniele and Giovanni Battista Serravalle, ca 1560, for Archduke Ferdinand II of Tirol. Note the addorsed boar heads at the base of the leaf shaped blade. A wonderful thing, if you're interested there's a half page color image in Lionello Boccia / Eduardo Coelho, ARMI BIANCHE ITALIANE (Editrice Bramante, 1975), item no. 413.
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Old 1st January 2018, 10:56 AM   #36
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General article I wrote several years ago on that topic, I wasn't aware back then about boar swords with permanently-fixed crossbars.
Requires registration via either Google or Facebook:
https://www.academia.edu/34183655/Hunting_Swords
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Old 1st January 2018, 12:18 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by broadaxe
General article I wrote several years ago on that topic, I wasn't aware back then about boar swords with permanently-fixed crossbars.
Requires registration via either Google or Facebook:
https://www.academia.edu/34183655/Hunting_Swords


Cool pdf, i note you got the young steven segal to pose for the title photo...
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Old 30th July 2019, 05:48 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philip
Note the inclusion of another pig poker -- the boar SPEAR in one of the images -- it's a famous one, part of a four-piece garniture (also including a marshal's baton and 2 swords) by Milanese armorers Daniele and Giovanni Battista Serravalle, ca 1560, for Archduke Ferdinand II of Tirol. Note the addorsed boar heads at the base of the leaf shaped blade. A wonderful thing, if you're interested there's a half page color image in Lionello Boccia / Eduardo Coelho, ARMI BIANCHE ITALIANE (Editrice Bramante, 1975), item no. 413.


I recently visted Kalmar Castle on the East coast of Sweden and spotted this decoration in the ceiling, depicting a medieval wild boar hunt with the use of boar spears.
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Old 31st July 2019, 04:47 AM   #39
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Thanks for posting this image! Would you happen to know approximately what year the interior and its decoration were installed? I'm trying to pin a date on the scene itself, the costumes look a couple of centuries more recent than medieval.

No big deal in and of itself -- even if it's 18th cent. the important thing is that it helps show the consistency of the basic boar spear concept across borders and centuries. The 15th cent, spear attributed to Prince Boris Aleksandrovich (Moscow Kremlin inv.no. 5867) would not, save for superficial decoration on its socket, be out of place among the modern piggy pokers sold in some gun shops catering to hunters in Germany and Poland. If it works, don't muck with it...
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Old 31st July 2019, 08:33 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philip
Thanks for posting this image! Would you happen to know approximately what year the interior and its decoration were installed? I'm trying to pin a date on the scene itself, the costumes look a couple of centuries more recent than medieval.

No big deal in and of itself -- even if it's 18th cent. the important thing is that it helps show the consistency of the basic boar spear concept across borders and centuries. The 15th cent, spear attributed to Prince Boris Aleksandrovich (Moscow Kremlin inv.no. 5867) would not, save for superficial decoration on its socket, be out of place among the modern piggy pokers sold in some gun shops catering to hunters in Germany and Poland. If it works, don't muck with it...


Kalmar Castle has origins from the 12thC and is situated on Swedenís Baltic coast. There were a lot of Germans living there and I think it was a Hanseatic city at some time? The castle was expanded and modernized over the centuries due to its strategic location. This particular hunting scene is in the Kingís Chamber of Swedish king Erik XIV and the ceiling is dated 1562 on the panels. It seems to me that the costumes and weapons used are compatible with that date, certainly not 18thC. The room was renovated in the mid 19thC.
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Old 31st July 2019, 10:44 AM   #41
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In Wales, Cardiff Castle and Castle Coch were restored by wealthy industrialists and decorated lavishly in High Medieval style during the mid 19c.
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Old 31st July 2019, 11:35 AM   #42
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Default Subjet to interpretation ..

These images are dated XVI century, included in the "Livre de Chasse" de Gaston Phoebus (Biblioteque Nationale de Paris).
It happens that, Gaston Phoebus, Count of Foix, a great hunter and author of the work, lived in the XIV century, two centuries prior to the date attributed to the images. To crack the riddle, one has to learn that these images illustrated a later XVI century edition... as i aldo have them illustrating this book i have "Eight Centuries of Hunting in Portugal" (Miguel Sanches de BaÍna - 1998).
Mind you, i am not a hunter ... just happen to have been offered the book.

.
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Old 1st August 2019, 05:09 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kronckew
In Wales, Cardiff Castle and Castle Coch were restored by wealthy industrialists and decorated lavishly in High Medieval style during the mid 19c.


Impressive example of the medieval revival in art, and the neo-Gothic architecture which wdrere iconic elements of 19th cent. Romanticist taste (the movement that's responsible for all those "Victorian copies" we encounter in the arms and armor marketplace today). The painting is interesting because it faithfully depicts medieval costume and architecture, but in a picture composed according to the standards of proportion, posture, and perspective that 19th cent. artists were trained in.

Lovely example of the style.
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