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Old 19th October 2012, 07:54 PM   #31
Sajen
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Thank you very much!
So when I understand correct is mine a sinampalok and the one from Barry (Vandoo) a dinahong-palay.

Regards,

Detlef
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Old 19th October 2012, 08:36 PM   #32
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Hello Sajen,
From what was explained to me is that your bolo is a sinampalok since it gradually tapers towards the hilt. Vandoo's bolo is a dinahong-palay since his blade doesn't taper much but goosenecks at the ricasso with sort of a hooklike projection. Both are really nice examples from around WWII and both have the inaso carved pommel. They were probably both made in either the Rinconada or Tabaco in Albay, Bicol. Hope this helps.

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Bangkaya
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Old 20th October 2012, 01:12 AM   #33
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The comments of (Datu) Bangkaya are very edifying indeed.

The only thing I can add is that according to one of my favorite historians, William Henry Scott, a study of ancient local vocabularies in our country reveals that the Bicolanos had the most number of terms for warfare and fighting (including sea raiding).

For instance in the well-studied Chinese account of southeast Asian sea raiders (from "Pisheya") that routinely attacked southern mainland China in the 12th century, these "Visayans" are being thought to be either from Samar or from Bicol. And the narrowing down to these two groups had something to do with the ocean jet stream that these sea raiders use to facilitate the going in and out of southern China.

And my own speculation is that Bicol swords are usually short and stubby precisely because of this naval or 'piratical' roots ...

PS - Goegraphically, Bicol is attached to Luzon. But ethnographically and historically, the Bicolanos are more of Visayans. The seas that separate Bicol from the Visayas actually link the two. Because for southeast Asians, waters connect while land masses (mountain ranges) divide.

Last edited by migueldiaz : 20th October 2012 at 12:59 PM. Reason: grammar
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Old 20th October 2012, 11:27 AM   #34
Nonoy Tan
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Here is the Chinese text regarding the Bisayan raiders of China which migueldiaz mentioned.
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Old 20th October 2012, 11:37 AM   #35
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Fr. Ignacio Alcina, S.J. who lived in the Philippines from 1632-1674, spent decades in the Bisayan islands and wrote a description of the Bisayan weapons and methods of warfare in two chapters of his work entitled "Historia de las islas e indios de Bisayas." Fr. Alcina, when referring to the Bisayans, meant not only Cebu, Panay, Bohol, Leyte and Samar, but also Bikol and Caraga of Mindanao. The Bisayan culture is predominant in these areas. For those interested in Bisayan weaponry, those two chapters are a must read.
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Old 20th October 2012, 11:50 AM   #36
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Thank you all three for the further and deep informations!

Regards,

Detlef
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Old 20th October 2012, 01:07 PM   #37
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Thanks Nonoy! And here's more info on those ancient Visayan sea raiders (Junker 2000:344):

"A thirteenth-century Chinese text provides a vivid description of the 'Pi-she-ya' ('painted or tattooed ones' [pintados, in Spanish]) maritime raiders, probably Visayans from the central Philippines, who created fear along the western littoral of the Philippines in the early first millennium A.D., seizing slaves and booty from coastal settlements (Chen 1966:271; Craig 1914:4; Laufer 1907:253-255; Scott 1984:74-75). The Pi-she-ya are even named as possible culprits in a series of thirteenth-century attacks on Cham [Vietnamese] settlements and other coastal centers of the Southeast Asian mainland."

And the in-depth study of the subject which included the Bicolanos as the possible Visayan group that did the sea raids then is: 'The Visayan Raiders of China Coast, 1174-1190 AD" by Efren Isorena (Phil. Quarterly of Culture & Society, Vol. 32, No. 2, June 2004).

Then lately, there's another article on the subject, from a local historian, Ambeth Ocampo: Pirates of the Visayas in China.
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Old 20th October 2012, 02:35 PM   #38
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migueldiaz,

Junker, Scott, Craig, Chen, Laufer, Ocampo, Lacouperie and other historians got their information from the Chinese text I posted which was written by 趙汝适 (Zhao Rugua) between 1209 and 1214. Isorena suggested Samar as the homeland of the Pishoye.

I posted the Chinese text so that others can make their own translation and interpretation of Zhao's words, independent of the scholars just mentioned.
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Old 20th October 2012, 02:42 PM   #39
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Quote:
"A thirteenth-century Chinese text provides a vivid description of the 'Pi-she-ya' ('painted or tattooed ones' [pintados, in Spanish]) maritime raiders, probably Visayans from the central Philippines, who created fear along the western littoral of the Philippines in the early first millennium A.D., seizing slaves and booty from coastal settlements (Chen 1966:271; Craig 1914:4; Laufer 1907:253-255; Scott 1984:74-75). The Pi-she-ya are even named as possible culprits in a series of thirteenth-century attacks on Cham [Vietnamese] settlements and other coastal centers of the Southeast Asian mainland."


Junker stated that raids were made on "Cham settlements and other coastal centers of Southeast Asian mainland." However, the original Chinese text say that raids were made in the villages of Shui-an and We-t'ou in Ts'an-chu-fu. Obviously, there is some reconcialtion yet to be made between the two statements.
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Old 19th July 2014, 07:09 AM   #40
Ian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sajen
This one ended recently by ebay. I am not the winner but I recognize the "bucao" stampon the blade. What will be the meaning?
I was looking through this old thread and came across the name BUCAO, which is place I have actually been through. It is located not in Bicol, but in the province of La Union, just south of Ilocos Sur and part of the traditional Ilocano area. The hilt on this knife (shown in post number 19) is distinctly different from the other knives shown here and is in the horse hoof style that I associate with Ilocano work. Therefore, I think this particular knife was at least hilted in northern Luzon, perhaps using a Bicol blade.

The elusive name DUGGAN in post number 27 is more likely to be DUBBAN which is near to the town of IRIGA in CAMARINES SUR (part of Bicol region)--as found on another example below (also post number 27)--and a recognized area for knife production.

In my experience, inscriptions on Luzon blades are most likely to indicate town of manufacture or simply state "Philippines." The next most common inscription is a date of manufacture or a commemorative date (e.g., 1945 is a common commemorative date, representing the year Macarthur returned to the Philippines, and not necessarily the date the knife was made). Occasionally a panday will "sign" his work with his initials. Lastly, and usually found only on higher end pieces, may be some personal information about the owner, such as a name, initials or special inscription/dedication. Owner's names and initials are more commonly found on sheaths than on blades.

Ian.

Last edited by Ian : 19th July 2014 at 07:27 AM.
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