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Old 19th March 2017, 04:36 PM   #1
Tim Simmons
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Thumbs up Burmese swagger stick

I do not collect this sort of silvery type of thing but this was to my mind a gift. 78cm long. I have African swagger sticks.
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Old 19th March 2017, 10:28 PM   #2
Nathaniel
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Swanky! Looks like Shan silverwork. Thanks for sharing, Tim!
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Old 20th March 2017, 12:07 AM   #3
Battara
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I agree with Nathaniel, looks like Shan silverware.
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Old 20th March 2017, 02:38 AM   #4
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Also that is interesting the weave pattern below the handle...unusual and especially exceptional that it continues on for such a length below it...certainly more labor intensive than simply welding a flat sheet I would think which would be more typical of what you find among traditional patterns.

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Old 20th March 2017, 02:48 PM   #5
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Gosh thanks chaps. "Swanky" I like the sound of that. I have had a nice Dha before but this piece has prompted me to look into the structure of the 19th century Royal Burmese Army. This must be related to command. More pictures when here.
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Old 21st March 2017, 03:51 AM   #6
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Tim, just a crazy thought, but no chance the top end is a handle with a concealed blade is there? I've seen some examples of concealed blades with some decorative riding crops or opium pipes....maybe this is just wishful thinking

Example History of Steel in Eastern Asia #278
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Old 21st March 2017, 03:27 PM   #7
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Here now, no hidden weapon. The main length of the stick is as thin as my little finger and even thinner towards the end. Interesting that the middle piece of silver has come from presumably an item of British silverware either a recycled piece or from purchased scrap. Initially I thought It was a repair. However now I believe the whole thing is assembled from separate pieces . The stick just does not feel as if it was damaged or broken in the past. The middle section holds the weave wire in place (two sections) so there is no twist and play. This also helps to keep the twist at the end. The recycled silver would mean tribal work rather than court work. A colonial officer would be unlikely to carry a native swagger stick. It could possibly have been made for a British officer that stayed behind the line in command of tribal forces {z force}. Who knows? Even more romantically perhaps collected after the fall of Mandalay
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