Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > Ethnographic Weapons
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 17th December 2006, 05:59 PM   #1
Lew
(deceased)
 
Lew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: East Coast USA
Posts: 3,191
Default Jambiya or Khanjar?

Hi All

Just picked this up my question is do you consider it a jambiya or a khanjar?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...em=330060810085

Lew
Attached Images
 
Lew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th December 2006, 06:47 PM   #2
Battara
EAAF Staff
 
Battara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 5,947
Default

In this area I would call this a jambiya, although other countries would call this a khanjar and still others would use both terms interchangebly.
Battara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th December 2006, 11:27 PM   #3
ward
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 637
Default

Saudi Arabia is the only place they are called jambiya. The word comes from the arabic word hip. Khanjar means dagger in arabic
ward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20th December 2006, 06:07 AM   #4
Philip
Member
 
Philip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: California
Posts: 478
Default

The Turks call these d.e. curved daggers "hancer". It's a phonetic rendition of the Arabic "khanjar" (= dagger), if you keep in mind that the Turkish "h" is a bit more gutteral than in English, and the "c" is pronounced like "j", the similarity is clear. In Morocco, this dagger configuration is called a "koumiya", but it's interesting to note that in the region, the weapon is slung from a shoulder-baldric of heavy cords, rather than inserted through a sash or directly attached to a belt as is done elsewhere.
Philip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20th December 2006, 11:52 AM   #5
ward
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 637
Default

Actually in present day Morocco it is called a khanjar. At least by every Berber or Taurag that I have met over there.
ward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st December 2006, 12:30 AM   #6
Philip
Member
 
Philip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: California
Posts: 478
Default

I'm not surprised that it is called a khanjar in the modern vernacular, after all it's a standard Arabic term. The term "koummiya" (sorry, I left out an "m" in my last post) is typically encountered in arms literature of the last century, Charles Buttin used it in his catalogs, an anternate spelling "koummya" is used by Alain Jacob in his LES ARMES BLANCHES DU MONDE ISLAMIQUE, and it is found in numerous books by 19th cent. travellers and explorers in the Maghreb.
Philip is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 09:33 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.