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Old 7th March 2019, 01:46 PM   #1
weapons 27
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Default sword and sheath for id please

could you identify this sword and this sheath ..
the sheath must belong to another knife.
thank to all
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Old 7th March 2019, 02:55 PM   #2
Bob A
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From the markings on the blade, and the shape of the handle, I'd put the sword somewhere in the Malay Archipelago.

While I've seen open-sided sheaths, I won't hazard a guess on this one's origin. (I haven't seen enough of them).
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Old 7th March 2019, 03:08 PM   #3
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North Vietnamese, I would think. Possibly called a Guom although it's a bit short.
The decoration at the forte indicates this to me.

The scabbard ???
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Old 7th March 2019, 04:10 PM   #4
Tim Simmons
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Chinese? sword blade made into 2 or 3 big knives in a jungle back woods settlement? Really like the scabbard.
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Old 7th March 2019, 04:49 PM   #5
josh stout
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The decoration on the blade definitely says Vietnamese, and the rest of the construction is consistent with that, but the scabbard is a mystery.

Did they come from the same place, or are they just associated by a collector.

Does the sword fit, or are they unrelated?
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Old 7th March 2019, 06:56 PM   #6
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I am with Rick and Josh, the sword is clearly Vietnamese and like all others I don't remember to have seen before a similar scabbard. But it look like made for a hatchet, material and design point in direction China or surrounding area IMVHO.

Regards,
detlef
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Old 7th March 2019, 09:57 PM   #7
Ren Ren
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Simmons
Chinese? sword blade made into 2 or 3 big knives in a jungle back woods settlement? Really like the scabbard.

Vietnamese also used Chinese characters. In the fourth photo, the inscription 用家 "Yong's family" (if read in Mandarin). In Vietnamese, 用 reads like Dụng.

I agree that this sword comes from North or North-West Vietnam (where the borders with Laos and China are located). I have seen similar scabbard in the mountaineers of Laos. They carried knives like sickle into them.
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Old 7th March 2019, 10:23 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick
Possibly called a Guom although it's a bit short.

This is a good question Vietnamese use the word "Guom" (or "Kiem") when talking about special made military swords. Utility knives are called "Dao" (or "Zao"), even if they can be used as combat ones.
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Old 8th March 2019, 11:22 AM   #9
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I bought this sword with this sheath .. I was not sure he was going with this sword .....
apparently he would belong to that sword ...
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Old 8th March 2019, 01:03 PM   #10
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The first character in the fifth photo is difficult to understand. Maybe 倉. In this case, the whole inscription 倉玉. Pronounced "Cāng Y" (in Mandarin) or "Thương Ngọc" (in Vietnamese). Translated means "Cyan Jade". This is like the name of a person.
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Old 9th March 2019, 07:45 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ren Ren
The first character in the fifth photo is difficult to understand. Maybe 倉. In this case, the whole inscription 倉玉. Pronounced "Cāng Y" (in Mandarin) or "Thương Ngọc" (in Vietnamese). Translated means "Cyan Jade". This is like the name of a person.

new photo character
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Old 9th March 2019, 01:34 PM   #12
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Thank you, so much better.

These are characters 食玉 handwritten in cursive. Pronounced "sh y" (in Mandarin) or "thực ngọc" (in Vietnamese). Translated "food jade". In a figurative sense, it means "premium food, gourmet detikates" - good wishes are often found on Vietnamese subjects.
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Old 11th March 2019, 11:31 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ren Ren
Thank you, so much better.

These are characters 食玉 handwritten in cursive. Pronounced "sh y" (in Mandarin) or "thực ngọc" (in Vietnamese). Translated "food jade". In a figurative sense, it means "premium food, gourmet detikates" - good wishes are often found on Vietnamese subjects.

thank you very much for the translation
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Old 11th March 2019, 02:21 PM   #14
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It's my pleasure
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Old 12th March 2019, 12:14 AM   #15
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that sheath reminds me of how billhooks/machetes are often worn in Taiwan

also I found this online: http://www.huitu.com/newmedia/detai...0851968903.html

looks similar...
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Old 11th June 2019, 06:02 PM   #16
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Default Help with identity,age,translation..tia

Just trying to figure out if this is a yataghan. And who the maker is and how old
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Old 16th June 2019, 12:02 PM   #17
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THE DATE SAYS 1212 Al Hijri and above that a note saying amal ahmed/hamed? made by ahmed/hamed?. That puts it in 1797 A.D. See https://habibur.com/hijri/1212/4/

PLEASE SHOW THE FULL WEAPON ...Thanks
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Last edited by Ibrahiim al Balooshi : 16th June 2019 at 12:13 PM.
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Old 16th June 2019, 12:16 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
PLEASE SHOW THE FULL WEAPON ...Thanks


And it would be great to create an own thread for this blade!
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Old 16th June 2019, 12:58 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sajen
And it would be great to create an own thread for this blade!


Seconded !!
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Old 16th June 2019, 01:59 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weapons 27
I bought this sword with this sheath .. I was not sure he was going with this sword .....
apparently he would belong to that sword ...
The style of large knife you show is common in northern Laos/Vietnam and has a strong Chinese flavor. This has already been discussed by others.

The open scabbard is one of many styles and was probably intended to carry a small mak. Although at one time the mak was a weapon, it is a common utility tool found widely in Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam. It is a curved utility knife somewhat resembling a sickle or bill hook, and a search of this site will show examples of varying lengths and styles (see here for example: http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=6204). Your scabbard would have held a short example of that working knife, which is used mainly to chop firewood, clear brush, etc.

Attached are three examples of mak. The two smaller ones are similar to what would have fitted originally in your scabbard. The longer one is used for heavier brush and cutting larger trunks.

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Last edited by Ian : 16th June 2019 at 02:24 PM.
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