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Old 6th July 2019, 01:51 PM   #1
Iain
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Default Nice takouba with 16th century blade

This was acquired for a friend, so I have been documenting it. Nothing we haven't discussed before, but a very nice blade with running wolf and cross and orb with original latten corresponding to the style common to the 16th century with this blade geometry. Might be a little earlier or later but this seems a fairly safe date range.

Nicely balanced hilt, but not the holdest hilt style, so likely early 19th century mounts or late 18th. No brass hilt plates as often seen on these old warriors, the guard was originally leather covered. The whole assembly is nice and tight, still very much a fighter!
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Old 6th July 2019, 02:45 PM   #2
Jim McDougall
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This is another amazing find Iain!!!
It is so heartening to see these blades still serving for not only generations but centuries!! It leads to wondering just how long it had been in the Taureg sphere. Was it among those early shipments of blades which came into the Sahara via trade routes described in the Briggs (1965) reference?
What is the estimated vintage of the hilt now in situ?

So many questions, and it perfectly exemplifys how Briggs brought forth one of the treasured sources of early European blades and makers often referred to in that field of study, via the conduit of Saharan swords. His work stands solid as one of the valuable resources on these blades in Africa.

It is interesting seeing this upper centrally situated fuller, to about 1/3 of the blade or slightly longer, as well as the application of the globus cruciger on one side and running wolf in the other, and in latten as often discussed.

A perfect benchmark in the study of these European blades, and how native imitations followed in later centuries.

Thank you for sharing this!!!
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Old 6th July 2019, 04:15 PM   #3
Iain
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McDougall
This is another amazing find Iain!!!
It is so heartening to see these blades still serving for not only generations but centuries!! It leads to wondering just how long it had been in the Taureg sphere. Was it among those early shipments of blades which came into the Sahara via trade routes described in the Briggs (1965) reference?
What is the estimated vintage of the hilt now in situ?

So many questions, and it perfectly exemplifys how Briggs brought forth one of the treasured sources of early European blades and makers often referred to in that field of study, via the conduit of Saharan swords. His work stands solid as one of the valuable resources on these blades in Africa.

It is interesting seeing this upper centrally situated fuller, to about 1/3 of the blade or slightly longer, as well as the application of the globus cruciger on one side and running wolf in the other, and in latten as often discussed.

A perfect benchmark in the study of these European blades, and how native imitations followed in later centuries.

Thank you for sharing this!!!


The hilt I'm confident is 18 or early 19th century work.

The blade likely came into the North African Ottoman sphere very early via alexandria. I would guess in the 16th century where it remained. Shipments from Europe were frequent despite papal bans. 😉
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Old 6th July 2019, 05:28 PM   #4
TVV
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It never gets old seeing these takouba with old European blades, thank you for sharing.
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Old 7th July 2019, 03:53 PM   #5
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Would you consider this type of blade to be a European blade of that age without the marks.
I have one such that arrived dismounted and trashed without even a tang, but otherwise, bar the marks, exactly the same......
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Old 7th July 2019, 05:48 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by David R
Would you consider this type of blade to be a European blade of that age without the marks.
I have one such that arrived dismounted and trashed without even a tang, but otherwise, bar the marks, exactly the same......


Depending on the geometry and steel quality it would certainly be a possibility. These older blades generally have a very gentle lenticular cross section after the fuller, newer ones new seem to be less smooth.

Feel free to post it!
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