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Old 28th April 2020, 09:33 AM   #1
francantolin
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Default swedish cutlass ?

Hello everybody,

I bought this cutlass without knowing it's origin,
I liked his kukri shape like !
I think it's a real old model

I found informations telling it is a swedish ? naval knife-cutlass

Do specialists know these ''stamps'' : A&E.H a crown and GvA on the guard

a 1848 or Later edition ?

? Kind regards
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Old 28th April 2020, 10:56 AM   #2
francantolin
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Better with these no pdf pictures,
I had problems to insert them this morning...
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Old 28th April 2020, 11:00 AM   #3
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Now that the pictures are ok !...

The cutlass-knife came with this item sold as a dagger,

I think more a shortened sword,
maybe an european british model ?
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Old 28th April 2020, 12:18 PM   #4
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I think the brass handled one is a Bandsman's short sword.
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Old 28th April 2020, 01:38 PM   #5
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No, as far as I'm informed this is the Swedish infantry side arm (Faschinenmesser) M 1848
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Old 28th April 2020, 02:18 PM   #6
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Hello Thank you David and Corrado for your comments !

Thank you David for the Bandsman short sword info,
I like the brass lion's head
I thought about a shortened sword because the blade ends
in a strange way...
What do you think ?

Kind regards
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Old 28th April 2020, 02:45 PM   #7
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Here some more fotos of the Swedish knife M 1848
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Old 28th April 2020, 02:59 PM   #8
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Thank you Corrado,

Yes sadly the scabbard is missing !...

I wonder why the are so many ''differents marks'' or blacksmiths/factory
for exactly the same model ?

( why I was asking about ''my'' stamps )
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Old 28th April 2020, 04:20 PM   #9
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It’s a Swedish Faskinkniv m/1848. It was produced under licence by Solingen based A&E Holler. I think the GvA is the stamp of the inspection officer but I don’t have the name although the “v” should be for von.
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Old 28th April 2020, 04:46 PM   #10
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Waohh ! Solingen A&H Holler
You nailed it ! Thank you !!!

( for the GvA and the crown, I will try to put a better picture...)
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Old 28th April 2020, 08:47 PM   #11
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The Swedish fascine knife m1848 was originally intended for the infantry, or at least parts of it. It seems to have become a standard infantry sidearm on the whole, and some examples are thought to have been used by police forces.

Some personnel in units of the coastal artillery were originally in the army, but transferred to the navy (which had responsibility for coastal artillery operations), and brought their sidearms with them. Some of these had the m/1848. This seems to be the extent of its use in the navy.

The trooper shown in the photo is of the Norrlands Trainkår, a train regiment, which handled the logistical requirements of troop equipment and supply.
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Old 28th April 2020, 09:29 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by francantolin
Hello Thank you David and Corrado for your comments !

Thank you David for the Bandsman short sword info,
I like the brass lion's head
I thought about a shortened sword because the blade ends
in a strange way...
What do you think ?

Kind regards


It's hard to say with these things, there are umpteen variations on the theme, and they were not (as far as a know) really regarded as a weapon so much as a uniform accessory, like buff leather belts and epaulettes. Not my speciality area, and I have little doubt but that others will weigh in with more and better information.
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Old 28th April 2020, 09:29 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MacCathain
The Swedish fascine knife m1848 was originally intended for the infantry, or at least parts of it. It seems to have become a standard infantry sidearm on the whole, and some examples are thought to have been used by police forces.

Some personnel in units of the coastal artillery were originally in the army, but transferred to the navy (which had responsibility for coastal artillery operations), and brought their sidearms with them. Some of these had the m/1848. This seems to be the extent of its use in the navy.

The trooper shown in the photo is of the Norrlands Trainkår, a train regiment, which handled the logistical requirements of troop equipment and supply.


I think the main purpose of the fascine knife was to cut branches and small trees with which to construct fascines which were then filled with soil to create cover for infantry. So I believe it was mostly intended to be used as a practical tool rather than a weapon, although it was clearly labelled a weapon and was said to be effective in close combat. Infantry at this time mostly relied on the rifle and bayonet rather than sword. Eventually it seems to have been worn by NCOs and for guard duty etc. There was a separate cutlas for the navy (not to be confused with the faskinkniv) which is impressive with a knuckleguard.
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Old 29th April 2020, 01:04 AM   #14
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I'll send this over to the European Side for more responses (and more appropriate ).
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Old 29th April 2020, 07:02 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Battara
I'll send this over to the European Side for more responses (and more appropriate ).


Ok Thank you !
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