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Old 4th May 2018, 02:32 PM   #31
Ian
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Hi Rob,

Now that is the kind of expert reply you don't get every day! What a gentleman to share freely such detailed knowledge.

Ian.
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Old 5th May 2018, 12:38 AM   #32
Chris Evans
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Rob,

Was nice of Mr Domenech to respond - He is a real gentleman and a scholar!

I forgot to ask in my earlier posts; Is there any evidence of the edge having been sharpened more than once or at all?

Cheers
Chris
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Old 7th May 2018, 12:46 AM   #33
RobT
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Hi Chris,

From the striations on the edge, it would appear that the blade has been sharpened with a stone.

Sincerely,
RobT
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Old 7th May 2018, 02:04 PM   #34
Chris Evans
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobT
Hi Chris,

From the striations on the edge, it would appear that the blade has been sharpened with a stone.

Sincerely,
RobT


Thanks for that reply. It would seem that it was indeed intended for some kind of use.

Cheers
Chris
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Old 7th May 2018, 10:28 PM   #35
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Hi Chris,

The edge isn't very sharp. It cut some paper drawn across it but didn't cut a piece of twine. I imagine that it is sharp enough if the blade was intended primarily as a point weapon.

Sincerely,
RobT
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Old 7th May 2018, 11:38 PM   #36
Chris Evans
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobT
Hi Chris,

The edge isn't very sharp. It cut some paper drawn across it but didn't cut a piece of twine. I imagine that it is sharp enough if the blade was intended primarily as a point weapon.

Sincerely,
RobT


Rob,

As a generalization, old bayonets make poor cutting knives because the steel was tempered to a lower hardness and the cross sectional geometry was less than optimal. As you say, they were primarily stabbing weapons.

Cheers
Chris
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