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Old 17th October 2015, 05:11 PM   #1
ASingh
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Default An unusual nagin type tulwar

Hi, I have attached some pictures of a rather unusual tulwar, with a straight double sided serrated blade. The blade is a bit flexible, but may not always have been quite so thin as it is now.
Best wishes,
ASingh
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Old 24th October 2015, 02:02 AM   #2
ariel
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How certain are you that it is not a newly-made one?
Strange mix of a serrated blade that is unlike any serrated one I have seen and a wavy keris-like one.

Is it even sharpened ?
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Old 24th October 2015, 09:28 AM   #3
ASingh
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[QUOTE=ariel]How certain are you that it is not a newly-made one?
Strange mix of a serrated blade that is unlike any serrated one I have seen and a wavy keris-like one.

Its highly unlikely to be newly made. Its part of what remains of a large stash of arms from a pre-colonial zamindari estate in Bihar, India.

Is it even sharpened ?[/QUOTE

It is sharpened, on both sides. I have attached closer photographs of the blade. This is after getting most of the old varnish off and a coat of conservator's wax on.
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Old 25th October 2015, 01:05 AM   #4
Bob A
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Is there any indication that the blade might have been constructed from a number of crescent-shaped plates? They certainly seem regular enough to suggest the possibility.
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Old 25th October 2015, 02:21 AM   #5
Rick
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Opinion:
Probably the blade was profiled that way rather than constructed of segments.
Putting an edge on it must have been a tedious process.
It doesn't look practical as a weapon; the edge would get hung on any kind of a parry.
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Old 25th October 2015, 06:11 AM   #6
Battara
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It would seem more like a ceremonial or parade weapon to me.

And to my eyes the construction seems to be out of one piece of steel. Besides, the forging of all these pieces like this would be a nightmare......
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Old 25th October 2015, 07:05 AM   #7
Tim Simmons
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It is done very nicely. I bet it is fully tempered as well. Not unusual to see parade pieces like this. It is very show off but I would not like to be run through with it.
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Old 25th October 2015, 03:14 PM   #8
Miguel
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I think that you have an unusual and rather unique sword, quite impracticle for battle but as already stated was probably made for ceremonial use. The blade smith must have been pretty accomplished. Thanks for sharing it with us.
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Miguel
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Old 25th October 2015, 06:41 PM   #9
Jim McDougall
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The linear progression of crescent moons in this blade seem to me to be most suggestive of some type of processional weapon used in ceremonial situations. While clearly this type of blade is not a combat oriented as this kind of erratic edge is most impractical in that instance. Even the serrated edge blades are ineffective as noted in some references (naturally debated), as to slashing, but completely useless in thrust (attempt).

In many Indian traditions and religious observances the cosmological symbolism is key, particularly lunar oriented (as in Rajput clans symbols).

Interesting provenance and particularly if is indeed of the pre colonial age suggested. It would be hard to establish accurately its age from photos, and Indian weaponry tends to remain in use long periods, and form traditionally followed.

In India, it was often the case where unusual and innovative forms were used to showcase the skills of artisans and encourage the patronage of wealthy and noble individuals.
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