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Old 23rd June 2020, 09:18 PM   #1
David
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Default Mystery Axe

I'm not sure where to place this so i'll start with it here.
This isn't mine, but belongs to a friend. It was labeled as a "French fur trade battleaxe", but that seems highly doubtful. It is possibly very recent, but it does have a vintage look, so who knows...
...um...so who knows? Anyone? Thanks!
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Old 23rd June 2020, 10:07 PM   #2
David R
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Possibly a firemans axe.
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Old 23rd June 2020, 11:44 PM   #3
A. G. Maisey
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To my eye this looks like a blacksmith's conversion of some sort of hammer head, or maybe recycling of a piece of axle.

The handle looks like it has been forge welded to the head.

The cutting edge is quite black, so maybe we're looking at a piece of steel inserted into an iron body. Can you see a joint? Inspection under magnification can assist.

Is there an eye in the head to take a timber handle? Maybe filled with a separate piece of metal? If not, then maybe its not a hammer head conversion, but that handle does look like a forge weld to the head, so it cannot be very recent, unless its a hobbyist's work.

I don't know about a war axe, I'd say something more like a case-makers hatchet.
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Old 24th June 2020, 06:00 AM   #4
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A very tool-like look to it.
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Old 24th June 2020, 09:10 AM   #5
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I think it might be a "Coal Hammer". When I was a lot younger coal arrived in sacks and was poured into a coal bunker ready for domestic use. Sometimes the pieces were too big to go on the fire, so you broke them up with a hammer. I can remember doing this as a lad. Some of these hammers were a bit fanciful, This could be one of them.
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Old 24th June 2020, 04:08 PM   #6
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What are the dimensions David?
The blunt end seems to be quite peened over signifying that it has been subjected to blows from an equally hard object. I have seen old splitting wedges showing the same deformation.
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Old 24th June 2020, 05:52 PM   #7
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Here's a railroad coal spike hammer, 20 in, handle, note the mushroomed head from hitting the coal to break it up. this one also has a spike. The axe blade would be handy for splitting kindling to start the fire. When I was a younger, I had to start a coal fire in the pot belly stove out in the tool room/workshop behind the garage every morning so the family would have hot water. We had a hatchet for the coal busting & kindling process...
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