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Old 24th April 2019, 12:42 PM   #1
alex8765
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Default Unknown dagger

Hi gents, Can you please help me to identify this dagger?
It's 13" long, hilt is brass and horn.
Thanks
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Old 24th April 2019, 01:00 PM   #2
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not my area of expertise but looks like a Southern European stiletto to me.
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Old 24th April 2019, 06:34 PM   #3
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Thanks! Could it be Spanish or Mexican?
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Old 24th April 2019, 06:53 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alex8765
Thanks! Could it be Spanish or Mexican?


I suppose it could be Spanish , but of course its not the typical Navaja style of knife I associate with Spain , though as I said ... this is not my field.
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Old 24th April 2019, 07:09 PM   #5
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The split grip separated by metal fixture at center etc. is a very Spanish affectation and knives fashioned after the plug bayonet form continued in Spain and its colonies well through 19th c. Often these were hunting type knives even though they looked like plug bayonets long since gone.
Here the blade is very much 'stiletto' as noted in style but of course broader and it would seem just carrying these conventions of plug bayonet and stiletto forward in a more recent dagger.
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Old 24th April 2019, 07:36 PM   #6
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Thank you!
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Old 24th April 2019, 07:41 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McDougall
The split grip separated by metal fixture at center etc. is a very Spanish affectation and knives fashioned after the plug bayonet form continued in Spain and its colonies well through 19th c.


I completely agree.
Therefore, I think that Argentina and Chile should also be taken into account.
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Old 24th April 2019, 08:01 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ren Ren
I completely agree.
Therefore, I think that Argentina and Chile should also be taken into account.


For similar reason, Philippines crossed my mind, though the knife does seem more likely coming from NW coast area of Mediterranean to me; Spain, Corsica, Sicily. A bit on the crude side for Italy and France, but it has that "rural vigor" sort of flavor.
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Old 24th April 2019, 08:23 PM   #9
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Argentina and Chile are definitely in the possible sphere for this as noted, as these are nominally Spanish, and the hilts on Chilean 'corvo' knife hilts, which are 'stacked' with these separators.

The Philippines also have this type affectation in their hilts in varying degree, so effectively by the hilt design this dagger could be from a broad scope of places in Spanish influence.

This is indeed crude, but local makers often tried to duplicate these finer weapons in kind, as Italy and often France typically set the pace for arms designs in many cases.
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Old 25th April 2019, 01:38 AM   #10
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I think Jim is right that this may well be a colonial daga. I don't think it is Filipino because the hilt is very unusual for Ilokano work and they produced most of these style daggers coming from the Philippines.

South America seems likely. There is a similar style knife in the essay on Gaucho Knives by Abel Domenech on this site. Brazil, Argentina, Chile are all possibilities. Perhaps you could send an email with a picture to Mr. Domenech and ask him for his thoughts. He has replied to previous requests from Forum members and seems a generous person with his knowledge.

Ian
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Old 25th April 2019, 12:44 PM   #11
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Thank you!
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Old 27th April 2019, 03:56 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian
I think Jim is right that this may well be a colonial daga. I don't think it is Filipino because the hilt is very unusual for Ilokano work and they produced most of these style daggers coming from the Philippines.

South America seems likely. There is a similar style knife in the essay on Gaucho Knives by Abel Domenech on this site. Brazil, Argentina, Chile are all possibilities. Perhaps you could send an email with a picture to Mr. Domenech and ask him for his thoughts. He has replied to previous requests from Forum members and seems a generous person with his knowledge.

Ian

these are from the phillipines.. influenced by daggers form mexico. they were and are made in luzon.. dagupan and around san fernanado (the one in the north.. phillipines seems to like to repeat place names frequently )
mexican ones are of a better quality .. and spanish obviously much better again
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Old 27th April 2019, 04:39 PM   #13
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My first impression was mexican, I have seen similars in Ebay...
Thanks
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Old 27th April 2019, 09:18 PM   #14
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I'd say Philippines as well. Strong Spanish influence and may have been made for the Spanish market. They were also quite popular with US GI's stationed there by the end of WWII, as personal purchase theater daggers.
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Old 28th April 2019, 07:41 AM   #15
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Reminds me of some touareg daggers...
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