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Old 24th September 2019, 03:03 PM   #1
mross
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Default Kaskara handle construction

Is there a proper form of handle construction on the Kaskara? Most of the ones that I have seen have a ring shaped pommel. Neither of mine have this. Granted the handle is damaged but the handle does not look like one was there. The wood is smooth and aged showing no signs of it have being broken. It also shows no sign of a pommel ever having been attached to the sword like many pommels are. I would like to restore my hilts but don't want to start until I have an understanding of exactly how it was originally put together. Thanks.
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Old 24th September 2019, 03:37 PM   #2
Iain
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mross
Is there a proper form of handle construction on the Kaskara? Most of the ones that I have seen have a ring shaped pommel. Neither of mine have this. Granted the handle is damaged but the handle does not look like one was there. The wood is smooth and aged showing no signs of it have being broken. It also shows no sign of a pommel ever having been attached to the sword like many pommels are. I would like to restore my hilts but don't want to start until I have an understanding of exactly how it was originally put together. Thanks.


The pommel was often formed purely from leather. Wrapped until the desired width of the pommel was achieved.
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Old 24th September 2019, 03:54 PM   #3
kronckew
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Originally Posted by Iain
The pommel was often formed purely from leather. Wrapped until the desired width of the pommel was achieved.

Were the wraps glued or otherwise secured to keep them from unravelling?some look like the disk is further covered in thin leather extending down and in around the grip then spiral wrapped in leather thong.
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Old 24th September 2019, 07:21 PM   #4
Edster
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I have two kaskara with leather covered pommels. The lighter colored one is virtually "new-old-stock". The finished size of the top disk is 41 mm dia. & 12 mm thick. The top disk is hard and firm and could tightly wrapped skin or even an annular wooden disk covered with skin over the top of the wooden grip top. The older example has the wrap/annular portion nailed to the grip top.

It appears that the wrap/annular had a piece of leather tucked between it and the grip top and then stretched to cover the wrap and tucked under so that the nails do not show.

The wooden grip on the old one appears to be covered with thin leather although I can't see/feel a join with the ends join. The new one is just wood. Both have a spiral wrap of 10 mm leather strip for 5-6 turns with the end stuck into a hole in the wood grip. The top of the grip is covered with the traditional Hadendawa tassel.

Some grips are completely covered by narrow leather strips, but I think these are local easy replacements.

If my descriptions are not clear enough, just ask.

Best,
Ed
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