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Old 30th April 2012, 10:57 PM   #211
Battara
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I would recommend that if you are to do that then heat up the liquid before applying it to the metal.
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Old 30th April 2012, 11:04 PM   #212
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Quote:
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I agree nice Maranao piece.


Can we call the kakatua pommel Maranao style ?
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Old 1st May 2012, 03:05 AM   #213
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Both Maranao and Maguindanao tribes used the kakatua hilts as well.

Good question.
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Old 1st May 2012, 10:50 AM   #214
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Since I already posted a thread on it, here it is: http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=15441
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Old 1st May 2012, 09:22 PM   #215
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Default COOL

Quote:
Originally Posted by freebooter
Damn right there, my budget is very weak now

My thanks to a quiet member for helping me obtain this example.....hmmmmm gold

Gav


AMAZING !! very beautiful weapon ! where did you find it ?
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Old 3rd May 2012, 11:51 AM   #216
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Default Arrived today.

These have just arrived. To be frank, when I bid on them I neither expected nor particularly wanted to get them. It was an experiment to see what would be accepted as a bid from the UK, ...and I won,... and they are here. So what have I got? Coming from China........they are slightly different from the posted vendors photo, one of them has a tang 27 cm 10.5 ins long but otherwise just as described and shown, width from barb to barb 5 cm on one and just under that on the other.
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Old 3rd May 2012, 12:35 PM   #217
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David R
These have just arrived. To be frank, when I bid on them I neither expected nor particularly wanted to get them. It was an experiment to see what would be accepted as a bid from the UK, ...and I won,... and they are here. So what have I got? Coming from China........they are slightly different from the posted vendors photo, one of them has a tang 27 cm 10.5 ins long but otherwise just as described and shown, width from barb to barb 5 cm on one and just under that on the other.


Modern, and an attempt at a replica of bronze Chinese arrowheads, Shang, Zhou, through to Warring States style. Most Chinese heads had relatively short tangs, but long tangs were used too. Also socketed heads, especially in Qin and Han. After that, iron/steel heads rather than bronze.

"Attempt" I say, since these are huge compared to the usual long-tanged Chinese bronze arrowheads. And very fat, too. The long 25cm or so ones are usually thinner, with much smaller blades. So, these look like the maker got the size very wrong. Perhaps these should be about 10-12 cm long?

I don't recognise what particular heads these are meant to be copies of, so can't check what the original size was.

These are usually brass, rather than bronze like the originals. The quality of the modern copies (not just of arrowheads, but spears, axes, swords, ge) varies a lot. Some are quite nice.
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Old 3rd May 2012, 01:13 PM   #218
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I am Not disappointed, as I did not expect them to be genuine, and the price was silly low, with free shipping an' all. In fact I don't see how they made anything on the deal. I am now torn between keeping them as a curiosity, or selling them at the next "Steampunk" fair with an outragous and tongue in cheek "backstory", (while making it clear they are modern).
They served their purpose as a test, I now know I can buy spear and arrow heads internationaly via ebay. Pity is I am put off buying anything from China, even passing up on a WW2 militia spearhead at a decent price, because of the likelyhood it was a more recent fake.
On another note, I just won these off ebay from Japan. Shabby, and so not desirable to the higher end collector, but interesting to me. And will go nicely with the yari.
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Old 3rd May 2012, 03:02 PM   #219
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Hey David, are those leggings or sleeves?
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Old 3rd May 2012, 03:25 PM   #220
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They are a sleeve,Kote, I think for the lower arm, ie back of the hand to the elbow, of a type called Han-gote or possibly Tekoh. (6)
The Edo period was generaly peacefull, with feuds, policing and piracy rather than war, so real combat armour tended to be light raiders stuff. Full armours were made but as ceremonial stuff not functional. I am hopefull these are examples of the lightweight gear. And if not, heh, no matter. Shipping is costing more than the bid, the total about what I pay for second hand Kimono.
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Last edited by David R : 3rd May 2012 at 03:28 PM. Reason: added text.
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Old 3rd May 2012, 03:30 PM   #221
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The above photo and drawing from this very usefull site http://www.iz2.or.jp/english/index.htm My ambition is to put the above gear, or something like it together using as much genuine stuff as possible.

Last edited by David R : 3rd May 2012 at 03:32 PM. Reason: added text.
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Old 3rd May 2012, 03:37 PM   #222
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Battara
Both Maranao and Maguindanao tribes used the kakatua hilts as well.

Good question.


It would be nice to establish regional/tribal styles if possible .
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Old 4th May 2012, 12:33 AM   #223
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my latest acquisition ... parts for "shamshir" (Khevsurian)
- type: Khmali
- origin: Georgia
- style: Persian
- steel garnitures with copper inlaid
very good state - 19th Century
as far as I understood, relatively rare, to rare

all the best

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Old 4th May 2012, 12:44 AM   #224
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Very nice pieces Dom. What are you going to do with them, mount them on a sword or display as separate bits.
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Old 4th May 2012, 01:34 AM   #225
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Dom, just beutiful! It is rare to see a complete matching set of shamshir fittings, especially when they are of a better quality such as yours
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Old 4th May 2012, 01:51 AM   #226
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Hi David, thanks Stan for your nice comments
very good, and pertinent question
several alternatives are ... front to me
- found a beautiful blade (johar) and handle,
without to forget to met some one able to make a good scabbard,
covered with leather, and with a spiral stitching brass ...
otherwise
- to keep it like it is, and to have it, in display
last alternative
- to sale it, will be not a concern to find a collector interested by

till yet, nothing decided, there no emergency

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Old 4th May 2012, 09:28 AM   #227
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Hi Dom, regarding the scabbard stitching, the thread is passed through short lengths of "gold bullion" which is a spiral wire used in embroidery, it is in fact usualy gold plated over silver. They still use it for uniforms in the UK, mainly for insignia, badges and rank markings. Also used in India for their goldwork on textiles.
If you have difficulty in getting it I have a couple of contacts that might help.
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Old 4th May 2012, 02:56 PM   #228
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David R
If you have difficulty in getting it I have a couple of contacts that might help.
Thanks a lot David
this kind of information is very important, too important to be ignored
and I've no touch in that field, actually
thank you in advance for information, and for your kind help

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Old 10th May 2012, 10:49 PM   #229
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My newest: a kukri/khukuri with a carved horn hilt. What is the tool with the loop used for?
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Old 11th May 2012, 10:14 AM   #230
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it's a button hook. typical tool with some khukuris. rare to find shoes with buttons nowadays, so most people have no clue as to what it is or how to use it. google 'button hook'.

the two most usually found standard tools are a karda - small utility knife - and a chakma(k) which is a hardened unsharpened tool used for burnishing the edge. some come with a multitude of tools: tweezers, awls, fire striker, tinder pouch, etc.
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Old 11th May 2012, 11:33 AM   #231
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My only guess for the hook tool would have been ear cleaner, but those are usually spoon shaped (at least in East Asia). Looking now, I see that ear cleaners in kukri tool kits have the same kind of spoon shaped tips as East Asian ones.

Both other tools are sharpened. Don't know if they originally were; both have signs of non-original sharpening. Haven't checked hardness yet.
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Old 11th May 2012, 03:20 PM   #232
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Default Button Hook

No ?
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Old 23rd May 2012, 01:29 AM   #233
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Smile Latest aquisitions and an update on an older.

Went to a local arms fair on Sunday, varied lots as always, and came away with these.
The curved knife is a puzzler, a sort of mini Kindjal. It is a tourist piece it is much better than the run of the mill item. My guess it has no great age, but made for wear with national costume, for dance or festival, or even for a child. The grip scales are horn, inlaid with dots of a pink material, and the grey rivit heads of base metal. The blade a good bright steel. The scabbard is neatly made, wood core, covered with leather and blackened metal.
Comments welcomed, actually comments invited please, I would like peeps opinion on both of these.
The update is on the kote, I took them into the R.A. where they were seen by Ian Bottomly. They are full kote for an "ashigaru" peasant spearman, cheap munition armour. The long plate at the right is the shoulder plate, small plates and mail on the upper arm, mail over the elbow, and long plates over the fore arm, no handguard as that is a samurai feature. Probably early Edo therefore, and Ian thinks they could even be 16thC.
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Last edited by David R : 23rd May 2012 at 01:38 AM. Reason: More info.
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Old 23rd May 2012, 06:34 AM   #234
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nice bhutanese dossum on the left. shows signs of it's traditional hairpin laminations.
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Old 23rd May 2012, 10:23 AM   #235
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David R
The curved knife is a puzzler, a sort of mini Kindjal.


David,
In my opinion it is a kurdish jambiya. Very nice one.
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Old 24th May 2012, 07:37 AM   #236
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this just followed me home, can i keep it?
i promise i'll look after it, and feed it and hug it and stroke it.
and empty it's litter box.
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Old 3rd July 2012, 12:20 AM   #237
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David R
They are a sleeve,Kote, I think for the lower arm, ie back of the hand to the elbow, of a type called Han-gote or possibly Tekoh. (6)
David, your kote appear to be ashigaru kote, basic armored sleeves for the ashigaru foot soldier. They would cover the arm from the shoulder to the wrist. Here is a pair to show how yours originally looked.
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Last edited by estcrh : 3rd July 2012 at 09:32 AM.
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Old 15th October 2012, 12:11 PM   #238
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Quote:
Originally Posted by estcrh
David, your kote appear to be ashigaru kote, basic armored sleeves for the ashigaru foot soldier. They would cover the arm from the shoulder to the wrist. Here is a pair to show how yours originally looked.

Hi estcrh I can confirm your ID, they were looked at by Mr Ian B at the RA and he said the same thing. I have given them a steam to relax the hemp backing, and now have to consider whether to go any further with them....they are still shabby but now more identifiable.
Since getting these I have had a few more bits in, and will post them soon. Sorry to be so late with an response, I managed to miss your posting till today.
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Old 15th October 2012, 04:32 PM   #239
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I did another arms fair over the weekend, and bought two new items. The Keris is posted over in the appropriate forum, a battered example but I am content with it at the price. The other is a small dha which I had seen the previous fair in a western scabbard. This time the dealer had it in the right one, albeit damaged...so I bought it, and filled a gap in my collection. The end of the sheath is damaged and lacking an end cap, so I will have to get one made for it.
The inlay is yellow metal and let in properly in cut cells as opposed to koftgari, in fact to me the blade looks a bit well made for the quality of the hilt and scabbard.
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Old 23rd October 2012, 03:40 AM   #240
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Nice brass inlay. Well done.
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