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Old 16th November 2019, 09:07 AM   #1
kronckew
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Default NE African Dagger/Hanger?

Just 'won' this at a local auction, will pick it up Monday.

Described as "A rare antique 19th century Victorian British Cavalry Sudanese sabre / sword. With wooden grip. Long curved blade, with point to tip. Measures approx; 80cm long"

Somehow I do not think this is accurate

I'm thinking more Ethiopian. Would like y'alls opinion.

Thanks in advance for any info. I think they meant it was 'acquired' by a UK Cavalry trooper after an argument where the original owner didn't need it any more, and the scabbard was misplaced in the melee.

Bit rusty, hopefully not too deep. At 80cm., it looks more like it's a long dagger or hanger. (Ethiopian shashqa? )

Grip may be a fibrous animal horn rather than wood.
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Old 16th November 2019, 10:58 AM   #2
Kubur
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Hi
Could be wood or rhino who knows...
I think this sword is a real problem and i doubt that someone would be able to say from where it comes from.
Sudan, Ethiopia (you have to look at the pommel hopefuly you will have a coin).
But also Erythrea or Somalia...
At least from these places...

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Old 17th November 2019, 02:47 AM   #3
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Default Wood Hilt, Lathe Turned

Hi All,

I am a fairly proficient woodworker and given the pattern on the hilt, I am pretty certain that the hilt is wood and a hardwood at that. I am also rather sure that the hilt has been lathe turned. Hope this helps.

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Old 17th November 2019, 09:30 AM   #4
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Thanks for your input. Probably is wood, but...

Yup. It's obvious from the shape and tool marks that it was lathe turned. Pole and foot treddle lathe have been around for millenia. Even saw a Nepali one where the Kami's assistant operated one by wrapping a rope around and holding a toggle at either end, alternately pulled while the Kami applied his chisel.

Sudan is known to have lathe turned cups made from the hairy horn of the
beast whose name we must not say. I'd imagine the raw mtls. would be available in NE Africa, here's one below:
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Old 18th November 2019, 07:06 AM   #5
Martin Lubojacky
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The saberīs hilt is not in Ethiopian style.
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Old 18th November 2019, 07:39 AM   #6
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Probably correct. May be a replacement by whoknowswho. Would look better with a proper shotel grip.

Edited: Picked it up this afternoon. It is longer than I thought. They measure the total length from tip to pommel as 80cm in a straight line, actually a tad more. Blade is actually 28 1/2in. (72cm)measured along the curve, grip is about 4 in. not counting the bolster. Blade is about a 1/4 in. thick at the bolster and has a nice distal taper to the point. first third is double edged flat V-grind with no secondary bevel. No markings. Grip does appear to be wood, not rhino. pommel end is peened over a small iron disk keeper, not a coin. Bit short for a cavalry sabre (especially for a camel jockey) but would suit an infantryman. Lots of surface rust and a heavy peppering of small pits, will clean the surface and see what happens. It's quite sharp.

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