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Old 16th December 2018, 02:08 PM   #31
Jim McDougall
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Thank you Richard!!! and well observed on the heirloom weapons which transcended often many generations and often into many campaigns. It was that sort of pride and honor that men carried into battle, and charged their strength, courage and resolve.

In Scotland, such was profoundly the case, and while vast numbers of their beloved basket hilts were hidden away in thatch, many blades were cut down and placed in dirks. The dirk was typically overlooked in the proscriptions as it had viable purpose in utility use.


Good analogy on the Japanese swords after WWII, and there are many great examples of these heirloom Samurai blades in Showa period and military mounts. I recall speaking with one of the number of Japanese men who advertised and sought recovery of these blades taken at the end of WWII.
While these were regarded of course as souvenirs and war trophies, it was not realized that these blades were regarded quite literally as the virtual souls of the warriors who used them. I recall one instance where one Samurai blade was returned to the family from which it came and it was placed reverently in a small temple in that accord.
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Old 17th December 2018, 01:28 PM   #32
Pukka Bundook
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A Very factual reply, Jim!
Yes, as officers supplied their own equipment, , old family accoutrements were very common.
If any of us were in this position, I think we would do Exactly the same, given the chance!
There is great comfort in a family piece, a tie to home, and at every viewing, a recall of the forbears, which could steady the nerves in times of uproar.
This would tie in very nicely with the common admonition; "Always remember who you are, and who you belong to".

Please pardon this if regarded as OT.

R.
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Old 17th December 2018, 03:17 PM   #33
Jim McDougall
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pukka Bundook
A Very factual reply, Jim!
Yes, as officers supplied their own equipment, , old family accoutrements were very common.
If any of us were in this position, I think we would do Exactly the same, given the chance!
There is great comfort in a family piece, a tie to home, and at every viewing, a recall of the forbears, which could steady the nerves in times of uproar.
This would tie in very nicely with the common admonition; "Always remember who you are, and who you belong to".

Please pardon this if regarded as OT.

R.



Thank you again Richard! I agree, in times where we would be facing the horrors of battle such heirlooms would remind us well of the things we fight for. Not at all OT! Such things are inherent in the arms we study and carry the stories and history so important in realizing their dimension.
There are many in the collecting world who overlook this, but hopefully discussions which include these aspects will help others appreciate their weapons more.
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