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Old 26th October 2012, 08:02 PM   #1
Indianajones
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Default Pics of Moro, Sulu's Sultan n Tagalog blades

Hi all, as I was just doing some research on a Philippine book -'The Philippine Islands' by John Foreman I found these two pics with interesting Moro (1st) and Christian tagalog (2nd) blades.
Especially in the first pic the middle 'the Sultan of Sulu's dress sword' attracted my attention as I would myself find it hard to ascribe it to a particular region. So hereby, hopefully for future reference . . . . .

Enjoy, copy n happy hunting!
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Old 26th October 2012, 08:48 PM   #2
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Thanks for pictures !! I think sword of the middle is from Borneo, a unusual type of parang nabur.
Thanks again
carlos
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Old 27th October 2012, 09:11 AM   #3
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Carlos, OEH n-i-c-e!!
Wel actually the text under says this particular sword was presented by 'his excellency' (Sultan of Sulu) to the author.
Yours is even nicer! I believe the actual Sulu islands are not much (land than!), so I reckon the chance would be very large that your sword would also have belonged to this Sultan/his family/other sultan?
Or . . . .the sultan has got it from Borneo; something to research.
Your 'tabak' (with the hand-le ) is also an extraordinary nice one!
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Old 27th October 2012, 03:44 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indianajones
Or . . . .the sultan has got it from Borneo; something to research.

This seems more likely to me. Just because the sword was "presented by his excellency to the author" does not mean that the sword originated within the region. I also have to wonder why the Sultan would give the author his dress sword. What the author was told at the time might not quite be the reality of the situation.
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Old 27th October 2012, 05:21 PM   #5
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Here is another very similar example for reference.
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Old 28th October 2012, 11:17 AM   #6
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CharlesS, actually I just noticed that this last specimen -in regarding to another topic as often Moro handles would depict/be called 'cockatoes'- actually resembles quite strongly a (small) parrotsbeak; highlighted in silver (?)metal.
Second as I tried to find a pic of a Sulu sultan with such a sword -no luck; only barongs n krisses- I saw they were of the opinion that also North Borneo (and Palawan and west Mindanao) belonged to their sultanate.

Dont you think the ornamentation of the handle (so characteristic for this sword) is more typically Sulu, seen their other floral decorating? Personally I am not familiar with any other cultures/objects than Murut from North Borneo.

Best greets
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Old 28th October 2012, 03:41 PM   #7
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I would never have even remotely attibuted these to be owned by Moros until I saw that pic of the "sultan's sword", and I had seen it a few years ago. Certainly the parrot of cockatoo pommel might be yet another parallel. Something else that intrigues me is the design on the fittings, not Moro okir at all, but there is a simulation/imitation of woven wire on both fittings. This is something we have all seen on better Moro and Malay kerises and sundangs, except that is was, of course, real woven wire, not an immitation of it.

Likely we are pulling at straws, but it has at least made me think about something I had never considered before. Could this style of "parang nabur" have been reserved as gifts, or specific to one culture, perhaps closely associated with the Moros??
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Old 28th October 2012, 05:16 PM   #8
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The okir on this last piece is not Sulu and not Moro. It is more Indonesian. I would posit that it was a gift to a Moro or at least acquired in trade. Lots of trade in this region.
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