Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > Ethnographic Weapons
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 25th April 2016, 08:04 PM   #1
kronckew
Member
 
kronckew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: CSA Consulate, Rm. 101, Glos. UK: p.s. - Real Dogs Have Feathering.
Posts: 2,482
Default Indian axe?

picked this one up for the starting price, only bidder. maybe because it IS a stage axe. i seem to recall similar axes from the tribal areas of NE india, but cannot find them online. only info is the pics, and a indication it's threee feet long, and the weight at 1.3 kilos. thought it might be worth a punt...

anyone recognise where it might have come from, other than the prop room?
needs a bit of oxide removal & oiling.

thanks for any info &/or comments.. for good or ill...
Attached Images
   
kronckew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th April 2016, 08:38 PM   #2
mahratt
Member
 
mahratt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Russia
Posts: 522
Default

My opinion - this is not the old thing. In addition, I can not remember such items with a "star". Although I will be glad if someone will show authentic old Indian ax, buyout will look like this
mahratt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th April 2016, 08:49 PM   #3
Jim McDougall
EAA Research Consultant
 
Jim McDougall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Route 66
Posts: 6,684
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mahratt
My opinion - this is not the old thing. In addition, I can not remember such items with a "star". Although I will be glad if someone will show authentic old Indian ax, buyout will look like this


I totally agree, the 'battle axe' was primarily out of the picture as a combat weapon quite early relative to most of the array of other arms used in India. They did however become popular in bearing and ceremonial or court context. That being the case, in my opinion these often well embellished arms seem intended to impress, and in this case even a bit over done to almost 'theatrical' proportions.
Jim McDougall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th April 2016, 10:57 PM   #4
kronckew
Member
 
kronckew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: CSA Consulate, Rm. 101, Glos. UK: p.s. - Real Dogs Have Feathering.
Posts: 2,482
Default

reminds me of this one i found with google: described as an 1800 model bulova axe...
Attached Images
 
kronckew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26th April 2016, 04:42 AM   #5
mahratt
Member
 
mahratt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Russia
Posts: 522
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kronckew
reminds me of this one i found with google: described as an 1800 model bulova axe...


Something tells me that this is not a description of the collection of the Ethnographic Museum or the Museum of arms and armor

Oh yeah. This is an advertisement for the sale)))) I would not always trust what they write sellers wishing to sell an item ....
mahratt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26th April 2016, 06:17 AM   #6
kronckew
Member
 
kronckew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: CSA Consulate, Rm. 101, Glos. UK: p.s. - Real Dogs Have Feathering.
Posts: 2,482
Default

ah, well. i can stick it in my OOPs corner. or re-sell it.
kronckew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th April 2016, 11:09 PM   #7
Timo Nieminen
Member
 
Timo Nieminen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 393
Default

To echo a lot of the above comment: modern.

When they not advertised as "Medieval axe" or "Mid-evil axe", they often called "star farsha". If you want to look for more examples, "star farsha axe" might be the best search term.
Timo Nieminen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th April 2016, 12:21 AM   #8
kronckew
Member
 
kronckew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: CSA Consulate, Rm. 101, Glos. UK: p.s. - Real Dogs Have Feathering.
Posts: 2,482
Default

interesting. that is definitely a copy of this axe. mine does not appear to be stainless steel, so assuming they copied something to come up with the star farsha stainless axe, this could be an earlier model that they copied. or did they copy an earlier real weapon?
kronckew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th April 2016, 01:05 AM   #9
ariel
Member
 
ariel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 3,939
Default

Somewhere I have a book called "Axes of Power" ( do not recall the name of the author).
According to it, the definitive sign of a fighting axe is the wedge head. Flat ones are always decorative.
ariel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th April 2016, 02:02 PM   #10
Ian
Vikingsword Staff
 
Ian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Little House on the Prairie
Posts: 2,068
Default

Ariel, are you referring to Axes of War and Power by James Gamble (2002)? I think that book is out of print now.

Ian.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ariel
Somewhere I have a book called "Axes of Power" ( do not recall the name of the author).
According to it, the definitive sign of a fighting axe is the wedge head. Flat ones are always decorative.
Ian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30th April 2016, 02:05 PM   #11
ariel
Member
 
ariel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 3,939
Default

Yup, that's the one. My wife rearranged my books, and I have to spend hours trying to find one...
They used to be in such easily understandable disarray... :-(((
ariel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30th April 2016, 11:27 PM   #12
broadaxe
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 305
Default

It is a modern axe from India, the 'star' one and the 'sickle' one were advertised in pairs (sometimes described as 'Mongolian battle axes'), usually at the end pages of various magazines of the 1990's. Blades were highly polished carbon steel.
broadaxe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1st May 2016, 09:51 AM   #13
kronckew
Member
 
kronckew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: CSA Consulate, Rm. 101, Glos. UK: p.s. - Real Dogs Have Feathering.
Posts: 2,482
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ariel
Somewhere I have a book called "Axes of Power" ( do not recall the name of the author).
According to it, the definitive sign of a fighting axe is the wedge head. Flat ones are always decorative.


it arrived sat. p.m., oddly enough the head tapers in thickness from the back edge & the tangs to the front. the crescent is welded to the two tangs, still it is a match for those modern replica star farshas. the star reinforces the tangs. the welds sadly counteract that by weakening the blade/tang junction as they are not overlapped, likely arc welded. otherwise heavily built. will clean it a bit, oil it and proudly display it in the closet. would make a better weapon of i cut the axe part off at the eye, leaving the spikes & spear point which are substantially built.
kronckew is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 10:59 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.