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Old 21st May 2020, 01:55 PM   #1
Peter U
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Default Rapier maker marks

Can someone please help me with the stamps on this rapier.
Are they authentic or 19th century copies?
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Old 21st May 2020, 04:30 PM   #2
fernando
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Welcome to the forum, Peter .
It could be that those marks pretend to resemble the real thing (German ?) but they would not be authentic.
I sincerely hope i am wrong, though .
Let's hear what other members have to say.
In the meantime, could you post pictures of the whole sword and hilt in different angles ... and a little larger ?
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Old 21st May 2020, 07:17 PM   #3
Peter U
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Thanks Fernando,

I presume it is a 19th century replica?
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Old 22nd May 2020, 04:49 PM   #4
CSinTX
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Looks 19th C to me.
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Old 22nd May 2020, 04:55 PM   #5
fernando
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CSinTX
Looks 19th C to me.

No doubt it is !
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Old 1st June 2020, 04:23 PM   #6
Jim McDougall
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I agree with CS, it seems to be a 19th c. mounting fabrication, probably using an older German blade. The mark is of the Weyersburg family and of the 'konigskopf' (kings head) type they typically used, in variation and in number. These have often been seen in groups of anywhere from one to four heads with some variation in the stamp through the generations.

In late 17th/18th c. England there was a location (I forget details further but believe described in Aylward, 1945) where blades were imported and sold in lots to 'sword slippers' to be mounted. One of the main thoroughfares was 'fluer de lis' street, where auctions and sales thrived.
The fluer de lis mark may be considered possibly for this outlet, though much more research would be required.

In any case, I think this may be an 18th century blade used for a 19th c. version of a rapier as a 'smoking room' antique, which were actually well made and in great demand in the baronial decor of Victorian times.
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