Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > Ethnographic Weapons
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 14th October 2020, 01:31 PM   #1
David R
Member
 
David R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 624
Default Check your barrels.

Some of you will relate to this. I was just now moving stuff round in my storeroom, and idly picked up a dismounted antique gun barrel I had bought over 30 years before. One of two I bought from Colonel Corrie. Having a ramrod in my hand at the time, I just poked it down the barrel, and it stopped a couple of inches short of the touch hole.
Into the kitchen and a rapid pouring of boiling water down the barrel... Yup, the small remnant of a black-powder charge and wad still down there, and now gone! Bought a long long time ago as a project and nothing done with it since.
I had earlier, again more than 30 years ago, bought a couple of percussion pistols from him, which I checked as soon as I got them.... and they were still loaded as well. No ball though.
They were Kurdish "Saturday Night Specials" that the Shah's police had confiscated and then sold to dealers out of Iran, I suspect the 2 very nice damascus twist long barrels were from the same source..... Sigh, those were the days my friends. The pistols were very cheaply made, in one case literally a gas pipe barrel, and the other a very nice old one with remains of koftgari. One lock hand made, and the other from a sidelock shotgun. The idea was that they were a shoot and dump item, pull the trigger and throw it over the wall. A bit like a "four winds" gun. If they were there a few days later, then they would be picked up for later use.
David R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th October 2020, 01:42 PM   #2
Kmaddock
Member
 
Kmaddock's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Ireland
Posts: 361
Default

Totally can relate to this
I have had 3 fully loaded weapons in my collection
2 were easy enough to get ball and charge out of

The brown bess was a lot more troublesome
I had to weld a wood screw to a steel bar
hammer bar and screw into lead ball (carefully with nothing delicate in front of barrel)
then twist rod to dig screw into lead ball and remove the rod + ball

wish i kept the ball but interestingly the powder under it flashed quiet well when match applied.

Keep safe and this is how I rectified my issue. I am not recommending it to anyone as the prefect method.

Ken
Kmaddock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th October 2020, 03:26 PM   #3
Will M
Member
 
Will M's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: In the wee woods north of Napanee Ontario
Posts: 245
Default

Black powder firearms are not considered loaded until a percussion cap is on the nipple, otherwise safe. Of course no one wants powder, ball or wads stuck down a bore. You can put oil down the nipple or bore and let it migrate into the obstruction, if any BP is present it will be neutralized by the oil, at least not ignite by a spark.
Will M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th October 2020, 06:45 PM   #4
Kubur
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 1,899
Default

I always target my wife with some old guns as a joke
I shouldn't, look what I found in a 19th c. pistol

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...t=barrel+powder

Kubur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th October 2020, 06:45 PM   #5
David R
Member
 
David R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 624
Default

You forget matchlocks and flintlocks. Dealing with them is indeed no big deal, if you know they are loaded. I personally know of a couple of cases where an attempt to clear the nipple on a percussion gun put a ball through the back door of the house.
David R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15th October 2020, 02:24 AM   #6
Will M
Member
 
Will M's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: In the wee woods north of Napanee Ontario
Posts: 245
Default

Hello David I'm sure that has happened since the invention of the Bic lighter.
When you want to make a spark using steel on steel it never happens
I know of someone who was burned by looking at a 76mm gun recoil system in a Cougar. He didn't wait for a flashlight and used a Bic lighter to see where the hydraulic leak/spray was coming from.
I believe anyone who's worked enough on firearms has had a mishap regardless of how safe.
If you're not 100% sure you can unload a firearm there is no shame in asking someone who can.
I almost became too impatient firing off a small cannon, the fuze burned but no bang. As I approached many seconds later the "bang" did happen. Luckily I was not behind it as it recoils a few feet and has good weight to it.
Will M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20th October 2020, 11:48 AM   #7
Mickey the Finn
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 50
Default

What do you call that? A "hangfire"? My Dad taught me when I was kid, with his Brno KAR98K [is it still a KAR98K if it's Brno manufactured, with no Waffenamt markings?] and firing south-west European ball ammunition: "Jos se on suutari…(if it's a dud)…"...give it a good thirty seconds, and if nothing happens, eject it into your hand and, quick as lightning, "paiskaa se puskaan" (throw it into the bush).
Blackpowder might be a bit "touchier" than metallic cartridges.
My Dad and my younger brother's Godfather [like Grandpa, to me, in a way], sighting in rifles, only ever yelled at me once, as far as firearms were concerned. They were shooting, using the roof of Dad's car as a rest, and I deked around front to get around (between shots, running at a crouch, head down, of course; they do it in war movies all the time. I couldn't have been safer borne on the wings of angels). They served me notice that I was never to pull a stunt like that again. After that day, I took anything they said with respect to firearms as dogma to be obeyed without question.
Mein Dank an die Königlich Preußische Armee (indirekt).
Mickey the Finn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st October 2020, 05:40 PM   #8
rickystl
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: St. Louis, MO area.
Posts: 1,535
Default

Hi David

So true. First thing I do when I get a muzzle loading gun is check and see if there is still a load in the barrel. Hard to believe that 150-200 year old powder, if kept dry, will still ignite.

In my case, I've only had one. An Albanian Tanchiks musket that was still loaded. Good thing someone didn't put priming powder in the pan to test the lock.

Rick
Attached Images
   
rickystl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st October 2020, 07:52 PM   #9
Victrix
Member
 
Victrix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Sweden
Posts: 453
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by David R
You forget matchlocks and flintlocks. Dealing with them is indeed no big deal, if you know they are loaded. I personally know of a couple of cases where an attempt to clear the nipple on a percussion gun put a ball through the back door of the house.


I’m sure that made their hobby even more popular with the wife!
Victrix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st October 2020, 08:03 PM   #10
fernando
Lead Moderator European Armoury
 
fernando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal
Posts: 8,017
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Victrix
I’m sure that made their hobby even more popular with the wife!

fernando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st October 2020, 08:23 PM   #11
David R
Member
 
David R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 624
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Victrix
I’m sure that made their hobby even more popular with the wife!


I think they remained married, but every-time there was a disagreement between them, they would yet again enter the land of regret.

....." They were shooting, using the roof of Dad's car as a rest, and I deked around front to get around (between shots, running at a crouch, head down, of course; they do it in war movies all the time. I couldn't have been safer borne on the wings of angels). They served me notice that I was never to pull a stunt like that again. After that day, I took anything they said with respect to firearms as dogma to be obeyed without question."......

I used to hang around at a friendly local gun shop and many tales and much wisdom was imparted to me. Including the guy who exited the car door just has his friend on the other side shot across the car roof with a 12 bore! They never found enough of the head to put in the coffin.
David R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th October 2020, 04:00 PM   #12
Pukka Bundook
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 785
Default

Hello David,

I think it was Major Noel Corry, Steeple Bumpstead, if I remember right.
He had a vast pile of ballast he had sent home.
A good few of his barrels were still loaded to some degree. The ones I bought were not, but our good friend Rudyard came by a few that way.
He had some very nice barrels, or at least they Had been.
The Galloping Major's barrels were Very reasonably priced!
Pukka Bundook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th October 2020, 09:41 PM   #13
David R
Member
 
David R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 624
Default

The very man indeed! I still have two of his barrels, one the aforementioned, and the other a rifled Damascus octagonal long percussion barrel.

We will never see the like of him again.
David R is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 04:57 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.